Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185531
Title:
Spouses' conflict profiles and the role of affect.
Author:
Phillips, Julie Ann.
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Marital research has demonstrated that one of the most important factors related to marital satisfaction is spouses' response to marital conflict. Three types of conflict behavior have been previously identified: problem solving, coercion, and avoidance. Problem solving has been linked to marital satisfaction, whereas coercion and avoidance have been linked to marital dissatisfaction. Previous marital researchers have studied couples' response to marital conflict as though spouses' typical response to conflict consists of only one of these types. In addition, marital researchers have only recently begun examining the role of emotion and cognitive processes in marital conflict. The present study is descriptive in nature and addresses three goals. First, subgroups of spouses and couples are identified based on the pattern of conflict behaviors they endorse. Second, relationships among perception of partner conflict behavior, specific emotions, and perception of self conflict behavior are explored. Third, sex differences found with regard to the first two goals are examined. Subjects consisted of two samples, a clinical sample and a research sample, resulting in a heterogeneous total sample of 117 couples. Cluster analysis identified four subgroups of husbands and five subgroups of wives. Differences in husband and wife clusters were consistent with previous marital conflict research. Although the valence of emotion was found to differentiate among the various subgroups of spouses, the type of emotion (e.g. sadness versus anger) was not found to differentiate these groups. However, regression analyses identified more complex relationships which varied with group identity and gender. In these relationships, the type of emotion was important. Limitations of the present study, clinical implications, and implications for future research are discussed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic; Clinical psychology
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ridley, Carl

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSpouses' conflict profiles and the role of affect.en_US
dc.creatorPhillips, Julie Ann.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, Julie Ann.en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMarital research has demonstrated that one of the most important factors related to marital satisfaction is spouses' response to marital conflict. Three types of conflict behavior have been previously identified: problem solving, coercion, and avoidance. Problem solving has been linked to marital satisfaction, whereas coercion and avoidance have been linked to marital dissatisfaction. Previous marital researchers have studied couples' response to marital conflict as though spouses' typical response to conflict consists of only one of these types. In addition, marital researchers have only recently begun examining the role of emotion and cognitive processes in marital conflict. The present study is descriptive in nature and addresses three goals. First, subgroups of spouses and couples are identified based on the pattern of conflict behaviors they endorse. Second, relationships among perception of partner conflict behavior, specific emotions, and perception of self conflict behavior are explored. Third, sex differences found with regard to the first two goals are examined. Subjects consisted of two samples, a clinical sample and a research sample, resulting in a heterogeneous total sample of 117 couples. Cluster analysis identified four subgroups of husbands and five subgroups of wives. Differences in husband and wife clusters were consistent with previous marital conflict research. Although the valence of emotion was found to differentiate among the various subgroups of spouses, the type of emotion (e.g. sadness versus anger) was not found to differentiate these groups. However, regression analyses identified more complex relationships which varied with group identity and gender. In these relationships, the type of emotion was important. Limitations of the present study, clinical implications, and implications for future research are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academicen_US
dc.subjectClinical psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRidley, Carlen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGamble, Wendyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberYost, Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcCloskey, Lauraen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKahn, Marvinen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShoham-Salomon, Varda-
dc.identifier.proquest9136861en_US
dc.identifier.oclc711793907en_US
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