Coping and adjustment in persons with rheumatoid arthritis and cardiac transplantation.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185529
Title:
Coping and adjustment in persons with rheumatoid arthritis and cardiac transplantation.
Author:
Perry-Simmons, Marla Jean.
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study examined the relationship between ways of coping and psychosocial adjustment to illness in cardiac transplant recipients and patients with chronic rheumatoid arthritis. The research questions were: (1) What coping patterns and levels of adjustment to illness are identified by heart transplant patients and rheumatoid arthritis patients? (2) What are the relationships between ways of coping and psychosocial adjustment to illness within these two populations independently and as a total chronic illness group? (3) How are cardiac transplant recipients similar to and different from patients with chronic rheumatoid arthritis regarding coping behavior and adjustment to illness? (4) Do specific coping styles seem to be linked to adjustment in certain life domains? Participants included 64 adults with rheumatoid arthritis and 66 adults who were cardiac transplant recipients. The subjects each completed two questionnaires, the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale and the Ways of Coping scale. They also answered four questions generated by the researcher which attempted to quantify frequency of symptoms and related degree of stress and perceived control over daily symptoms and long-term course of illness. This study provided some evidence that people use the same coping strategies regardless of medical diagnosis. The data also suggested that coping through distancing and escape-avoidance may result in relationship problems and possibly increased psychological and work-related problems. Further research should be conducted to examine how coping mechanisms are learned and how one's coping repertoire can be expanded to include more useful strategies.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Special Education and Rehabilitation; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Organist, James

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCoping and adjustment in persons with rheumatoid arthritis and cardiac transplantation.en_US
dc.creatorPerry-Simmons, Marla Jean.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPerry-Simmons, Marla Jean.en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the relationship between ways of coping and psychosocial adjustment to illness in cardiac transplant recipients and patients with chronic rheumatoid arthritis. The research questions were: (1) What coping patterns and levels of adjustment to illness are identified by heart transplant patients and rheumatoid arthritis patients? (2) What are the relationships between ways of coping and psychosocial adjustment to illness within these two populations independently and as a total chronic illness group? (3) How are cardiac transplant recipients similar to and different from patients with chronic rheumatoid arthritis regarding coping behavior and adjustment to illness? (4) Do specific coping styles seem to be linked to adjustment in certain life domains? Participants included 64 adults with rheumatoid arthritis and 66 adults who were cardiac transplant recipients. The subjects each completed two questionnaires, the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale and the Ways of Coping scale. They also answered four questions generated by the researcher which attempted to quantify frequency of symptoms and related degree of stress and perceived control over daily symptoms and long-term course of illness. This study provided some evidence that people use the same coping strategies regardless of medical diagnosis. The data also suggested that coping through distancing and escape-avoidance may result in relationship problems and possibly increased psychological and work-related problems. Further research should be conducted to examine how coping mechanisms are learned and how one's coping repertoire can be expanded to include more useful strategies.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education and Rehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorOrganist, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSales, Amosen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJensen, Marilynen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWrenn, Roberten_US
dc.identifier.proquest9136859en_US
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