ALCOHOLISM TREATMENT AND THE RELATIONSHIP OF NATIVE AMERICAN CULTURAL VALUES TO RECOVERY.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185526
Title:
ALCOHOLISM TREATMENT AND THE RELATIONSHIP OF NATIVE AMERICAN CULTURAL VALUES TO RECOVERY.
Author:
FLORES, PHILIP JOHN.
Issue Date:
1983
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Native American groups have been reported to suffer disproportionately higher rates of alcohol related disorders than does the dominant Anglo population. This problematic situation is compounded by the fact that Native American alcoholics have a far lower rate of alcoholism recovery than do most other groups receiving treatment. Research recommendations underscores the necessity of matching the philosophy and methods of a treatment program to fit the specific cultural values of Native American alcoholics. To explore this hypothesis, this research project attempted to provide empirical and descriptive data which would help determine if specific value differences between Anglos and Native Americans could be identified. If once identified, the relationships of these values to alcoholism and recovery would be explored. Subjects were voluntary admissions into an inpatient treatment program in a southwestern community mental health center over a nine month period (1981-82). Forty-three Native Americans (34 males, 9 females) completed a series of assessments which included the Rokeach Value Survey. Native American alcoholics (9 males) completing treatment two months later were given the same series of assessments as were two comparison groups of 20 non-alcoholic Native Americans (10 males, 10 females) and 20 alcoholic Anglos (16 males, 4 females). The Anglo staff at the treatment center was also given the Rokeach Value Survey. This study provides evidence which supports the poorer prognostic rates of alcoholism recovery for Native Americans. Evidence is also presented which indicates that Native American's values are measurable and significantly different from Anglo values. This study failed to provide support for claims which suggest cultural influences overrides individual pathology and personality differences. Rather, this study suggests alcoholism overrides cultural influences and differences. Alcoholic Native Americans proved to be more similar to other alcoholics--even if these alcoholics were Anglos--than they were to the non-alcoholic cultural peers when value differences on the Rokeach Value Survey were excluded from comparisons.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Kahn, Marvin

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleALCOHOLISM TREATMENT AND THE RELATIONSHIP OF NATIVE AMERICAN CULTURAL VALUES TO RECOVERY.en_US
dc.creatorFLORES, PHILIP JOHN.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFLORES, PHILIP JOHN.en_US
dc.date.issued1983en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractNative American groups have been reported to suffer disproportionately higher rates of alcohol related disorders than does the dominant Anglo population. This problematic situation is compounded by the fact that Native American alcoholics have a far lower rate of alcoholism recovery than do most other groups receiving treatment. Research recommendations underscores the necessity of matching the philosophy and methods of a treatment program to fit the specific cultural values of Native American alcoholics. To explore this hypothesis, this research project attempted to provide empirical and descriptive data which would help determine if specific value differences between Anglos and Native Americans could be identified. If once identified, the relationships of these values to alcoholism and recovery would be explored. Subjects were voluntary admissions into an inpatient treatment program in a southwestern community mental health center over a nine month period (1981-82). Forty-three Native Americans (34 males, 9 females) completed a series of assessments which included the Rokeach Value Survey. Native American alcoholics (9 males) completing treatment two months later were given the same series of assessments as were two comparison groups of 20 non-alcoholic Native Americans (10 males, 10 females) and 20 alcoholic Anglos (16 males, 4 females). The Anglo staff at the treatment center was also given the Rokeach Value Survey. This study provides evidence which supports the poorer prognostic rates of alcoholism recovery for Native Americans. Evidence is also presented which indicates that Native American's values are measurable and significantly different from Anglo values. This study failed to provide support for claims which suggest cultural influences overrides individual pathology and personality differences. Rather, this study suggests alcoholism overrides cultural influences and differences. Alcoholic Native Americans proved to be more similar to other alcoholics--even if these alcoholics were Anglos--than they were to the non-alcoholic cultural peers when value differences on the Rokeach Value Survey were excluded from comparisons.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairKahn, Marvinen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReitan, Ralphen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHohmann, Georgeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHsiao, Sigmunden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMadison, Peteren_US
dc.identifier.proquest8311409en_US
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