Optimal use of ethnobotanical resources by the Mountain Pima of Chihuahua, Mexico.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185519
Title:
Optimal use of ethnobotanical resources by the Mountain Pima of Chihuahua, Mexico.
Author:
Laferriere, Joseph Edward.
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Mountain Pima of the Sierra Madre Occidental of Chihuahua, Mexico, utilize a variety of domesticated and nondomesticated resources. Part of their agricultural system consists of shifting, or swidden, cultivation on steep hillsides. Wild edible plants contribute significant amounts of vitamins and minerals to the diet on a seasonal basis. The drought of 1988 caused a decrease in the availability of many resources, but an increase in availability of roots of saraviqui (Prionosciadium townsendii). A dynamic, nonlinear optimization study of Mountain Pima diet included requirements for adequate amounts of energy, protein, calcium, and vitamins A and C. Oxalate content of several plant foods and seasonal variation in resource availability were incorporated into the study. Two methods were compared: time minimization and a nutrient indexing method minimizing the product of the absolute value of the natural logarithm of the ratio of recommended intake to actual intake rates. This method allowed simultaneous optimization of several different parameters. The nutrient indexing model matched the actual diet of the Mountain Pima somewhat better than the traditional energy minimization model. It predicted higher use of noncultivated plant species and of animal resources than the time minimization model. Analyses were conducted for years of adequate rainfall and for the drought year. A list of 612 plant species collected in the community of Nabogame is also included.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Pima Indians -- Mexico -- Economic conditions; Ethnobotany -- Mexico -- Chihuahua (State); Chihuahua (Mexico : State) -- Economic conditions; Sierra Madre (Mexico) -- Economic conditions.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Van Asdall, Willard

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleOptimal use of ethnobotanical resources by the Mountain Pima of Chihuahua, Mexico.en_US
dc.creatorLaferriere, Joseph Edward.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLaferriere, Joseph Edward.en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Mountain Pima of the Sierra Madre Occidental of Chihuahua, Mexico, utilize a variety of domesticated and nondomesticated resources. Part of their agricultural system consists of shifting, or swidden, cultivation on steep hillsides. Wild edible plants contribute significant amounts of vitamins and minerals to the diet on a seasonal basis. The drought of 1988 caused a decrease in the availability of many resources, but an increase in availability of roots of saraviqui (Prionosciadium townsendii). A dynamic, nonlinear optimization study of Mountain Pima diet included requirements for adequate amounts of energy, protein, calcium, and vitamins A and C. Oxalate content of several plant foods and seasonal variation in resource availability were incorporated into the study. Two methods were compared: time minimization and a nutrient indexing method minimizing the product of the absolute value of the natural logarithm of the ratio of recommended intake to actual intake rates. This method allowed simultaneous optimization of several different parameters. The nutrient indexing model matched the actual diet of the Mountain Pima somewhat better than the traditional energy minimization model. It predicted higher use of noncultivated plant species and of animal resources than the time minimization model. Analyses were conducted for years of adequate rainfall and for the drought year. A list of 612 plant species collected in the community of Nabogame is also included.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPima Indians -- Mexico -- Economic conditionsen_US
dc.subjectEthnobotany -- Mexico -- Chihuahua (State)en_US
dc.subjectChihuahua (Mexico : State) -- Economic conditionsen_US
dc.subjectSierra Madre (Mexico) -- Economic conditions.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEcology and Evolutionary Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorVan Asdall, Willarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRobichaux, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDonoghue, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberThompson, Richarden_US
dc.identifier.proquest9136850en_US
dc.identifier.oclc702371566en_US
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