Salient role-identity, attitude, and self-presentation: Self-monitoring and situation as moderators.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185498
Title:
Salient role-identity, attitude, and self-presentation: Self-monitoring and situation as moderators.
Author:
Choi, Eun-Jung.
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The concept of self-presentation plays a critical role in much sociological and psychological theorizing about human behavior. Although a number of experimental studies of self-presentation have been conducted, until recently theorizing about self-presentation has not been translated into testable hypotheses. This paper attempts to fill this void with an empirical examination of self-presentation as it applies to religious verbal self-presentation related to salient religious role-identity and religious attitude. This research on self-presentation was guided by two major theories: structural symbolic interactionism and trait psychology. The data, obtained from a sample of undergraduates to a questionnaire, provide an examination of the relationship between salient role-identity, attitude, and self-presentation taking into account individual differences in self-monitoring and situation. Two causal models were estimated with weighted least square (WLS) method using the program LISREL 7. The most important findings are that salient role-identity is more strongly associated with self-presentation for high self-monitors than for low self-monitors in both formal and informal situations; attitude is more strongly associated with self-presentation for low self-monitors than for high self-monitors in both types of situations; and situation and self-monitoring interact, so that the stronger association between attitude and self-presentation occurs for low self-monitors in formal situations, and the stronger association between salient role-identity and self-presentation exists for high self-monitors in informal situations. Implications and limitations of the findings are discussed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic; Social psychology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Sociology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Snow, David A.
Committee Chair:
Snow, David A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSalient role-identity, attitude, and self-presentation: Self-monitoring and situation as moderators.en_US
dc.creatorChoi, Eun-Jung.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChoi, Eun-Jung.en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe concept of self-presentation plays a critical role in much sociological and psychological theorizing about human behavior. Although a number of experimental studies of self-presentation have been conducted, until recently theorizing about self-presentation has not been translated into testable hypotheses. This paper attempts to fill this void with an empirical examination of self-presentation as it applies to religious verbal self-presentation related to salient religious role-identity and religious attitude. This research on self-presentation was guided by two major theories: structural symbolic interactionism and trait psychology. The data, obtained from a sample of undergraduates to a questionnaire, provide an examination of the relationship between salient role-identity, attitude, and self-presentation taking into account individual differences in self-monitoring and situation. Two causal models were estimated with weighted least square (WLS) method using the program LISREL 7. The most important findings are that salient role-identity is more strongly associated with self-presentation for high self-monitors than for low self-monitors in both formal and informal situations; attitude is more strongly associated with self-presentation for low self-monitors than for high self-monitors in both types of situations; and situation and self-monitoring interact, so that the stronger association between attitude and self-presentation occurs for low self-monitors in formal situations, and the stronger association between salient role-identity and self-presentation exists for high self-monitors in informal situations. Implications and limitations of the findings are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academicen_US
dc.subjectSocial psychology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSnow, David A.en_US
dc.contributor.chairSnow, David A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShockey, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcAdam, Douglasen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGreenberg, Jeffen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberIttelson, William H.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9130811en_US
dc.identifier.oclc710835286en_US
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