Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185472
Title:
The culture of clinical teaching.
Author:
Pardo, Dona.
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this exploratory case study was to describe the culture of clinical teaching through a symbolic interactionist framework, by identifying the rituals, faculty behaviors, and student behaviors and characteristics valued by faculty instructing in clinical settings, using content analysis, interviews and observation. Five faculty, one from each clinical specialty, were chosen using specific criteria. College of Nursing archives were content analyzed to ascertain written valued student behaviors and characteristics and faculty were interviewed to learn their stated beliefs. Faculty/student clinical interactions were observed to assess if faculty written and verbalized beliefs were enacted, and twelve students were interviewed for verification of transmission of the values. Peer debriefing, member checking and an audit trail ensured trustworthiness of the data. Faculty used eight rituals: Preparation, Tracking, Discourse, Closet, Repast, Selection, Maneuver, and Documentation, and three types of actions: Teaching, Role Modeling, and Caretaking to transmit their values. Teaching was utilized 55 percent of the time and involved questioning, instructing, guiding, correcting and observing. Role Modeling, used 22 percent, embodied promoting independence, helping, intervening, kidding and admitting fallibility. Caretaking was evidenced 23 percent of the instructor's time and included caring, praising, diffusing anger, allowing mistakes and sharing self. Over one hundred student behaviors and characteristics that faculty valued were identified and collapsed into six descriptors, listed in descending order: assertive, therapeutic, compliant, knowledgeable, disciplined, and skillful. Faculty placed emphasis on human, interactive skills versus knowledge and psychomotor skills, and responded to students with very caring behaviors. They utilized compassion as a way of effecting conformity, and their use of caring behaviors for the exercise of their power was evident.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Nursing -- Study and teaching (Higher) -- United States; Nursing students -- United States -- Attitudes.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Foundations and Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rhoades, Gary

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe culture of clinical teaching.en_US
dc.creatorPardo, Dona.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPardo, Dona.en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this exploratory case study was to describe the culture of clinical teaching through a symbolic interactionist framework, by identifying the rituals, faculty behaviors, and student behaviors and characteristics valued by faculty instructing in clinical settings, using content analysis, interviews and observation. Five faculty, one from each clinical specialty, were chosen using specific criteria. College of Nursing archives were content analyzed to ascertain written valued student behaviors and characteristics and faculty were interviewed to learn their stated beliefs. Faculty/student clinical interactions were observed to assess if faculty written and verbalized beliefs were enacted, and twelve students were interviewed for verification of transmission of the values. Peer debriefing, member checking and an audit trail ensured trustworthiness of the data. Faculty used eight rituals: Preparation, Tracking, Discourse, Closet, Repast, Selection, Maneuver, and Documentation, and three types of actions: Teaching, Role Modeling, and Caretaking to transmit their values. Teaching was utilized 55 percent of the time and involved questioning, instructing, guiding, correcting and observing. Role Modeling, used 22 percent, embodied promoting independence, helping, intervening, kidding and admitting fallibility. Caretaking was evidenced 23 percent of the instructor's time and included caring, praising, diffusing anger, allowing mistakes and sharing self. Over one hundred student behaviors and characteristics that faculty valued were identified and collapsed into six descriptors, listed in descending order: assertive, therapeutic, compliant, knowledgeable, disciplined, and skillful. Faculty placed emphasis on human, interactive skills versus knowledge and psychomotor skills, and responded to students with very caring behaviors. They utilized compassion as a way of effecting conformity, and their use of caring behaviors for the exercise of their power was evident.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectNursing -- Study and teaching (Higher) -- United Statesen_US
dc.subjectNursing students -- United States -- Attitudes.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Foundations and Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRhoades, Garyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSlaughter, Sheilaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOrt, Suzanne Vanen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9125450en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701107831en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.