Effects of soil amendments on crusting, seedling emergence and yield of onion, tomatoes and peppers.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185461
Title:
Effects of soil amendments on crusting, seedling emergence and yield of onion, tomatoes and peppers.
Author:
Yacoub, Mohamed Mohamed.
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The effects of sulfur-containing amendments (H₂SO₄,Al₂(SO₄)₃ and gypsum) or crust formation, soil chemical properties, seedling emergence and yields of onions (Allium cepa), tomatoes (Lycopersicum esculentum) and chili peppers (Capsicum sp.) were studied on a Pima clay loam soil. Treatments were surface applied on a strip above the seeds. The chemicals influenced the penetrometer index, soil-pH, electrical conductivity, DPTA-extractable soil Fe, Cu, Zn, Mu and seedling emergence in two greenhouse experiments. Gypsum and H₂SO₄ increased seedling emergence while Al₂(SO₄)₃ reduced the soil-pH and EC more than H₂SO₄ and gypsum. Based upon penetrometer readings, H₂SO₄ was the best anti-crusting agent tested followed by gypsum and Al₂(SO₄)₃. At the end of the study, all soil samples were very low in KCl extractable Al, showing that Al toxicity was not responsible for seedling damage. Gypsum decreased levels of Mn and Zn but did not affect Fe and Cu. Al₂(SO₄)₃ increased Fe and Zn, decreased Cu but did not affect Mn. H₂SO₄ did not affect extractable Mn, Cu, Zn and Fe levels. In a field study using two water qualities at Safford, gypsum produced the most tomato seedlings whereas Al₂(SO₄)₃ and H₂SO₄ produced the least. Onion stand counts were not affected by the chemicals with either water. Gypsum, H₂SO₄ and Al₂(SO₄)₃ polymer produced the highest pepper stand counts with the saltier water but there were no differences with lower salt water. Tomatoes produced the highest yield with gypsum and lowest with H₂SO₄ and Al₂(SO₄)₃ with saltier water. With lower salt water, gypsum produced highest yield, followed by the H₂SO₄. Both H₂SO₄ treatments produce low yields. Onions showed no treatment response under lower salt water, while with saltier water, gypsum and H₂SO₄ produced the highest yields. Pepper yields were not affected by amendments with the lower salt water. Al₂(SO₄)₃ polymer, H₂SO₄ and gypsum increased yields with the saltier water. Varieties of peppers and tomatoes produced different yields in response to water quality in a supplementary field study.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Soil amendments; Gypsum as soil amendment; Soil crusting; Onions -- Seedlings; Tomatoes -- Seedlings; Peppers -- Seedlings.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Soil and Water Science; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Stroehlein, Jack L.
Committee Chair:
Stroehlein, Jack L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEffects of soil amendments on crusting, seedling emergence and yield of onion, tomatoes and peppers.en_US
dc.creatorYacoub, Mohamed Mohamed.en_US
dc.contributor.authorYacoub, Mohamed Mohamed.en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe effects of sulfur-containing amendments (H₂SO₄,Al₂(SO₄)₃ and gypsum) or crust formation, soil chemical properties, seedling emergence and yields of onions (Allium cepa), tomatoes (Lycopersicum esculentum) and chili peppers (Capsicum sp.) were studied on a Pima clay loam soil. Treatments were surface applied on a strip above the seeds. The chemicals influenced the penetrometer index, soil-pH, electrical conductivity, DPTA-extractable soil Fe, Cu, Zn, Mu and seedling emergence in two greenhouse experiments. Gypsum and H₂SO₄ increased seedling emergence while Al₂(SO₄)₃ reduced the soil-pH and EC more than H₂SO₄ and gypsum. Based upon penetrometer readings, H₂SO₄ was the best anti-crusting agent tested followed by gypsum and Al₂(SO₄)₃. At the end of the study, all soil samples were very low in KCl extractable Al, showing that Al toxicity was not responsible for seedling damage. Gypsum decreased levels of Mn and Zn but did not affect Fe and Cu. Al₂(SO₄)₃ increased Fe and Zn, decreased Cu but did not affect Mn. H₂SO₄ did not affect extractable Mn, Cu, Zn and Fe levels. In a field study using two water qualities at Safford, gypsum produced the most tomato seedlings whereas Al₂(SO₄)₃ and H₂SO₄ produced the least. Onion stand counts were not affected by the chemicals with either water. Gypsum, H₂SO₄ and Al₂(SO₄)₃ polymer produced the highest pepper stand counts with the saltier water but there were no differences with lower salt water. Tomatoes produced the highest yield with gypsum and lowest with H₂SO₄ and Al₂(SO₄)₃ with saltier water. With lower salt water, gypsum produced highest yield, followed by the H₂SO₄. Both H₂SO₄ treatments produce low yields. Onions showed no treatment response under lower salt water, while with saltier water, gypsum and H₂SO₄ produced the highest yields. Pepper yields were not affected by amendments with the lower salt water. Al₂(SO₄)₃ polymer, H₂SO₄ and gypsum increased yields with the saltier water. Varieties of peppers and tomatoes produced different yields in response to water quality in a supplementary field study.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSoil amendmentsen_US
dc.subjectGypsum as soil amendmenten_US
dc.subjectSoil crustingen_US
dc.subjectOnions -- Seedlingsen_US
dc.subjectTomatoes -- Seedlingsen_US
dc.subjectPeppers -- Seedlings.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSoil and Water Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorStroehlein, Jack L.en_US
dc.contributor.chairStroehlein, Jack L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTucker, T.C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDutt, G.R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBriggs, R.E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBartels, P.G.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9124167en_US
dc.identifier.oclc703169573en_US
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