Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185459
Title:
BUNYAVIRUS PERSISTENCE IN AEDES ALBOPICTUS CELL CULTURES.
Author:
FLORKIEWICZ, ROBERT ZIGMOND.
Issue Date:
1982
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Some viruses which infect plants, animals and man are transmitted by an intermediary arthropod vector. The viruses for which this is true are termed arboviruses (Arthropod-borne-viruses). In many instances the virus delivered to the new host results in the establishment of a disease state and/or the death of the infected host. In all instances, however, the arthropod (invertebrate) vector is apparently unaffected by the virus it is carrying. One family of viruses which are transmitted to their vertebrate host via an arthropod vector is the virus family Bunyaviridae, in this dissertation specifically the viruses Inkoo and Uukuneimi are described. The characteristics of Inkoo and Uukuneimi growth in both vertebrate baby hamster kidney (BHK-21, WI2) and invertebrate Aedes albopictus (mosquito) cell cultures has been examined. Vertebrate cells supported, to a high titer, the growth of both Inkoo and Uukuneimi virus while Aedes albopictus cell cultures supported high titer growth of Inkoo but not Uukuneimi. In both cases, however, the vertebrate cells were killed as a cosequence of infection where as, the invertebrate infection did not result in cell death or in detectable cytopathic effect. The invertebrate cells infected with either Inkoo or Uukuneimi continue to grow and also continue to express virus specific (actinomycin D resistent) RNA synthesis. The virus infected invertebrate cells are characterized as being persistently infected because of their resistence to homologous virus superinfection and by detectable virus specific RNA synthesis. Virus released from the Inkoo persistently infected cells displays a heterogeneous plaque morphology as well as temperature sensitive virus plaque mutants. Virus particles released from the Inkoo persistently infected Aedes albopictus cells are considered defective interfering-like. The RNA profile both intracellularly and of released virus particles from the persistently infected cell cultures is different from that observed during vertebrate cell culture infections. Cell death resulted from infection of BHK-21 WI2 cells with virus from Inkoo persistently infected Aedes albopictus cell cultures. The virus plaque morphology and RNA profile is similar to standard virus infection of BHK-21 WI2 cells. The experiments with tissue culture virus-cell systems aids in understanding the natural transmission of arboviruses between the vertebrate-invertebrate portions of the arbovirus natural life-cycle.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Arboviruses.; Host-virus relationships.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Cellular and Developmental Biology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleBUNYAVIRUS PERSISTENCE IN AEDES ALBOPICTUS CELL CULTURES.en_US
dc.creatorFLORKIEWICZ, ROBERT ZIGMOND.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFLORKIEWICZ, ROBERT ZIGMOND.en_US
dc.date.issued1982en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSome viruses which infect plants, animals and man are transmitted by an intermediary arthropod vector. The viruses for which this is true are termed arboviruses (Arthropod-borne-viruses). In many instances the virus delivered to the new host results in the establishment of a disease state and/or the death of the infected host. In all instances, however, the arthropod (invertebrate) vector is apparently unaffected by the virus it is carrying. One family of viruses which are transmitted to their vertebrate host via an arthropod vector is the virus family Bunyaviridae, in this dissertation specifically the viruses Inkoo and Uukuneimi are described. The characteristics of Inkoo and Uukuneimi growth in both vertebrate baby hamster kidney (BHK-21, WI2) and invertebrate Aedes albopictus (mosquito) cell cultures has been examined. Vertebrate cells supported, to a high titer, the growth of both Inkoo and Uukuneimi virus while Aedes albopictus cell cultures supported high titer growth of Inkoo but not Uukuneimi. In both cases, however, the vertebrate cells were killed as a cosequence of infection where as, the invertebrate infection did not result in cell death or in detectable cytopathic effect. The invertebrate cells infected with either Inkoo or Uukuneimi continue to grow and also continue to express virus specific (actinomycin D resistent) RNA synthesis. The virus infected invertebrate cells are characterized as being persistently infected because of their resistence to homologous virus superinfection and by detectable virus specific RNA synthesis. Virus released from the Inkoo persistently infected cells displays a heterogeneous plaque morphology as well as temperature sensitive virus plaque mutants. Virus particles released from the Inkoo persistently infected Aedes albopictus cells are considered defective interfering-like. The RNA profile both intracellularly and of released virus particles from the persistently infected cell cultures is different from that observed during vertebrate cell culture infections. Cell death resulted from infection of BHK-21 WI2 cells with virus from Inkoo persistently infected Aedes albopictus cell cultures. The virus plaque morphology and RNA profile is similar to standard virus infection of BHK-21 WI2 cells. The experiments with tissue culture virus-cell systems aids in understanding the natural transmission of arboviruses between the vertebrate-invertebrate portions of the arbovirus natural life-cycle.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectArboviruses.en_US
dc.subjectHost-virus relationships.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCellular and Developmental Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHall, Jenniferen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMendelson, Neilen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBourque, Dnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcReynolds, Larryen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8217412en_US
dc.identifier.oclc681959258en_US
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