Relationship of personal and demographic variables with perceptions of automated office attitudes, knowledge, and skills of community college academic administrators.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185445
Title:
Relationship of personal and demographic variables with perceptions of automated office attitudes, knowledge, and skills of community college academic administrators.
Author:
La Clair, Claudia Dee.
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study examined academic administrators from Arizona community colleges to determine whether those with different personal (age, sex, administrative experience, office automation experience) and demographic (job title, geographic location) characteristics differed in their office automation attitudes and their perceptions of knowledge and skills. Three subsidiary interests of the study were to examine whether administrators with different (1) perceptions of the importance of--and comfort with--automation skills and knowledge differ in their automation attitudes, knowledge, skill, and geographic location, (2) different demographic variables differ in their amount of--and skill with--automation equipment and software, and (3) different attitudes, knowledge, and skill characteristics differ in their use of automation equipment and software. The literature review discussed the evolution and impact of office automation, office automation in educational settings, and the nature of skills and knowledge in office automation. Research questions focused on the differences in office automation attitudes and perceptions of office automation knowledge and skill of administrators with different (1) personal and demographic characteristics, (2) perceptions of the importance (professionally and to their office) of--and comfort with--office automation, and (3) amounts of, skill with, and use of office automation equipment and software. Results suggest that academic administrators generally (1) have positive office automation attitudes, (2) view office automation as professionally important and important to their offices, (3) show deficiencies in their office automation knowledge and skill. In addition, younger administrators (25-46 years), with the job titles of Dean/Associate Dean, who have experience with office automation (9-15 years) and are employed by urban community colleges are more likely to implement office automation in their offices than older administrators (over 46 years), with the titles of Division Chair or Vice President, who have worked with office automation less than 9 years or more than 16 years, and who are employed by rural community colleges. Recommendations are suggested for continued study in evaluation and assessment of academic administrators' office automation attitudes, knowledge, and skill.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic; Education, Higher -- Administration.
Degree Name:
Ed.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Foundations and Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Grant, Robert

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleRelationship of personal and demographic variables with perceptions of automated office attitudes, knowledge, and skills of community college academic administrators.en_US
dc.creatorLa Clair, Claudia Dee.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLa Clair, Claudia Dee.en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study examined academic administrators from Arizona community colleges to determine whether those with different personal (age, sex, administrative experience, office automation experience) and demographic (job title, geographic location) characteristics differed in their office automation attitudes and their perceptions of knowledge and skills. Three subsidiary interests of the study were to examine whether administrators with different (1) perceptions of the importance of--and comfort with--automation skills and knowledge differ in their automation attitudes, knowledge, skill, and geographic location, (2) different demographic variables differ in their amount of--and skill with--automation equipment and software, and (3) different attitudes, knowledge, and skill characteristics differ in their use of automation equipment and software. The literature review discussed the evolution and impact of office automation, office automation in educational settings, and the nature of skills and knowledge in office automation. Research questions focused on the differences in office automation attitudes and perceptions of office automation knowledge and skill of administrators with different (1) personal and demographic characteristics, (2) perceptions of the importance (professionally and to their office) of--and comfort with--office automation, and (3) amounts of, skill with, and use of office automation equipment and software. Results suggest that academic administrators generally (1) have positive office automation attitudes, (2) view office automation as professionally important and important to their offices, (3) show deficiencies in their office automation knowledge and skill. In addition, younger administrators (25-46 years), with the job titles of Dean/Associate Dean, who have experience with office automation (9-15 years) and are employed by urban community colleges are more likely to implement office automation in their offices than older administrators (over 46 years), with the titles of Division Chair or Vice President, who have worked with office automation less than 9 years or more than 16 years, and who are employed by rural community colleges. Recommendations are suggested for continued study in evaluation and assessment of academic administrators' office automation attitudes, knowledge, and skill.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academicen_US
dc.subjectEducation, Higher -- Administration.en_US
thesis.degree.nameEd.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Foundations and Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGrant, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNelson, L.O.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHeckman, Paul E.-
dc.identifier.proquest9124154en_US
dc.identifier.oclc709618896en_US
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