Effects of tuition increases on community college enrollments in the state of Washington: A student price response study.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185438
Title:
Effects of tuition increases on community college enrollments in the state of Washington: A student price response study.
Author:
Lee, Wai-Fong Tang.
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to investigate how changes in tuition and fees affect community college enrollment patterns in the state of Washington, and to identify other key factors that have major effects on enrollment changes. Several enrollment categories were selected for analysis: Total headcount, FTE, first-time freshmen, minority students, full-time and part-time attendance, two age groups, gender, and academic and vocational programs. The theoretical framework was derived from demand theory in microeconomics, with particular application of the concepts of price elasticity and of the demand function. Eight independent variables were examined, including tuition prices, student aid, socioeconomic factors, and a State enrollment cap. The results were based on a time-series analysis of system-wide data from 1971-1987. The major findings were that (1) own-tuition price was associated negatively with all categories of enrollment, except for academic programs; (2) tuition and fees at public four-year institutions had positive effects on community college enrollments; (3) student aid was a key factor and related to enrollment negatively, suggesting that public four-year institutions were substitutes for community colleges; (4) personal income was a stronger economic indicator than unemployment for most of the enrollment categories; (5) the proportion of whites in the population had different effects on different enrollment groups; and (6) the enrollment cap caused a substantial reduction in most of the enrollment categories. Different types of students responded differently to price changes and other factors. In general, older students, part-timers, females, and minority students were more sensitive to tuition price changes than younger, male, and full-time students. Overall, the results of the study were consistent with previous enrollment demand studies of community colleges.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic; Education, Higher -- Administration.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Foundations and Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Leslie, Larry L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEffects of tuition increases on community college enrollments in the state of Washington: A student price response study.en_US
dc.creatorLee, Wai-Fong Tang.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, Wai-Fong Tang.en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to investigate how changes in tuition and fees affect community college enrollment patterns in the state of Washington, and to identify other key factors that have major effects on enrollment changes. Several enrollment categories were selected for analysis: Total headcount, FTE, first-time freshmen, minority students, full-time and part-time attendance, two age groups, gender, and academic and vocational programs. The theoretical framework was derived from demand theory in microeconomics, with particular application of the concepts of price elasticity and of the demand function. Eight independent variables were examined, including tuition prices, student aid, socioeconomic factors, and a State enrollment cap. The results were based on a time-series analysis of system-wide data from 1971-1987. The major findings were that (1) own-tuition price was associated negatively with all categories of enrollment, except for academic programs; (2) tuition and fees at public four-year institutions had positive effects on community college enrollments; (3) student aid was a key factor and related to enrollment negatively, suggesting that public four-year institutions were substitutes for community colleges; (4) personal income was a stronger economic indicator than unemployment for most of the enrollment categories; (5) the proportion of whites in the population had different effects on different enrollment groups; and (6) the enrollment cap caused a substantial reduction in most of the enrollment categories. Different types of students responded differently to price changes and other factors. In general, older students, part-timers, females, and minority students were more sensitive to tuition price changes than younger, male, and full-time students. Overall, the results of the study were consistent with previous enrollment demand studies of community colleges.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academicen_US
dc.subjectEducation, Higher -- Administration.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Foundations and Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLeslie, Larry L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSacken, Donal M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAhumada, Martín Miguelen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9123488en_US
dc.identifier.oclc709609469en_US
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