Correlates of spousal and parental alcoholism: An examination of the validity of the theory of codependency among wives and children of alcoholics.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185432
Title:
Correlates of spousal and parental alcoholism: An examination of the validity of the theory of codependency among wives and children of alcoholics.
Author:
Hinkin, Charles Henry.
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The concept of codependency has been advanced in recent years in an effort to explain certain psychological and behavioral traits purported to be characteristic of spouses and adult children of alcoholics. The core symptoms which have been considered to define codependency are: low self-esteem, dependency, depression, and excessive sensitivity to interpersonal opprobrium. Secondary features are: defensiveness, anger, marital discord, lower self-perceived psychological health in ones family of origin, and excess alcohol use. To test the validity of this hypothesized syndrome, 97 female subjects married to either an alcoholic (SA) (n = 31), a psychiatric patient (SP) (n = 35), or a dentistry patient (SD) (n = 31) were studied. These subjects were further dichotomized based on whether they had a positive family history (FH+) for alcoholism. Following the obtaining of informed consent, all subjects were administered a battery of psychological tests consisting of the MMPI-168, SCL-90, TSCS, DPE, DAS, and FOS. The results of 2-way MANOVA revealed a significant main effect for both husbands' diagnosis and family history for alcoholism for both the primary and secondary features of codependency. No interaction was present between the grouping factors. Relative to the SD subjects, the SA subjects significantly differed in the expected direction on measures of dependency, depression, interpersonal sensitivity, anger, dyadic adjustment, and prevalence of excess alcohol use. The SA subjects significantly differed from the SP subjects on all of the above measures with the exception of depression. FH+ subjects, compared to FH- subjects, significantly differed in the expected direction on measures of self-esteem, interpersonal sensitivity, anger, degree of psychological health in the family of origin, and prevalence of excess alcohol use. Contrary to expectation, the FH- group scored higher on the administered measure of defensiveness. With the exception of lower levels of psychological health in the family of origin, the SA/FH+ subjects did not statistically differ from the SA/FH- subjects. In addition, the SA and FH+ subjects also evidenced significantly higher scores on many other measures of psychologic symptomatology not purported to be characteristic of codependency. It was therefore concluded these data suggest that two dissociable subtypes of codependency may be identifiable: one subtype associated with parental alcoholism and one associated with spousal alcoholism.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic; Clinical psychology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kahn, Marvin

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCorrelates of spousal and parental alcoholism: An examination of the validity of the theory of codependency among wives and children of alcoholics.en_US
dc.creatorHinkin, Charles Henry.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHinkin, Charles Henry.en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe concept of codependency has been advanced in recent years in an effort to explain certain psychological and behavioral traits purported to be characteristic of spouses and adult children of alcoholics. The core symptoms which have been considered to define codependency are: low self-esteem, dependency, depression, and excessive sensitivity to interpersonal opprobrium. Secondary features are: defensiveness, anger, marital discord, lower self-perceived psychological health in ones family of origin, and excess alcohol use. To test the validity of this hypothesized syndrome, 97 female subjects married to either an alcoholic (SA) (n = 31), a psychiatric patient (SP) (n = 35), or a dentistry patient (SD) (n = 31) were studied. These subjects were further dichotomized based on whether they had a positive family history (FH+) for alcoholism. Following the obtaining of informed consent, all subjects were administered a battery of psychological tests consisting of the MMPI-168, SCL-90, TSCS, DPE, DAS, and FOS. The results of 2-way MANOVA revealed a significant main effect for both husbands' diagnosis and family history for alcoholism for both the primary and secondary features of codependency. No interaction was present between the grouping factors. Relative to the SD subjects, the SA subjects significantly differed in the expected direction on measures of dependency, depression, interpersonal sensitivity, anger, dyadic adjustment, and prevalence of excess alcohol use. The SA subjects significantly differed from the SP subjects on all of the above measures with the exception of depression. FH+ subjects, compared to FH- subjects, significantly differed in the expected direction on measures of self-esteem, interpersonal sensitivity, anger, degree of psychological health in the family of origin, and prevalence of excess alcohol use. Contrary to expectation, the FH- group scored higher on the administered measure of defensiveness. With the exception of lower levels of psychological health in the family of origin, the SA/FH+ subjects did not statistically differ from the SA/FH- subjects. In addition, the SA and FH+ subjects also evidenced significantly higher scores on many other measures of psychologic symptomatology not purported to be characteristic of codependency. It was therefore concluded these data suggest that two dissociable subtypes of codependency may be identifiable: one subtype associated with parental alcoholism and one associated with spousal alcoholism.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academicen_US
dc.subjectClinical psychology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKahn, Marvinen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAllender, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberComer, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKaszniak, Alfreden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRosser, Rosemaryen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9123483en_US
dc.identifier.oclc709783970en_US
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