Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185406
Title:
Cesium atomic resonance filter.
Author:
Batdorf, Brian James.
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
An atomic resonance filter (ARF), composed of a cell containing an absorbing gas and two interference/absorption filter stacks, is designed to be both wide angle and ultra-narrowband. The bandwidth of this filter, in the range of 1-10mA, is determined by the absorption linewidth of the absorbing gas. Light entering the ARF within this bandwidth excites the gas to a highly excited state, and the fluorescence cascade back to the ground state emerges from the gas cell as the detected signal. The interference/absorption filter stacks insure that light not interacting with the gas does not pass through the ARF. The ARF is necessarily wide-angle due to the isotropic absorption properties of the gas. This dissertation models the processes involved in atomic absorption to determine the performance of an ARF that uses cesium as the absorbing gas. This model uses the Voigt absorption profile to obtain a correlation between the frequency of the traveling photon and the velocity of the absorbing atom. Results of computer simulations based on this model are presented along with experimental measurements. The ARF characteristics of importance include its efficiency and the temporal response of the filter. These characteristics are determined as a function of temperature and the input photon frequency. The effect of an additional buffer gas, which is included to decrease the ARF response time is investigated.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic; Optics.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Optical Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Macleod, H. Angus

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCesium atomic resonance filter.en_US
dc.creatorBatdorf, Brian James.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBatdorf, Brian James.en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAn atomic resonance filter (ARF), composed of a cell containing an absorbing gas and two interference/absorption filter stacks, is designed to be both wide angle and ultra-narrowband. The bandwidth of this filter, in the range of 1-10mA, is determined by the absorption linewidth of the absorbing gas. Light entering the ARF within this bandwidth excites the gas to a highly excited state, and the fluorescence cascade back to the ground state emerges from the gas cell as the detected signal. The interference/absorption filter stacks insure that light not interacting with the gas does not pass through the ARF. The ARF is necessarily wide-angle due to the isotropic absorption properties of the gas. This dissertation models the processes involved in atomic absorption to determine the performance of an ARF that uses cesium as the absorbing gas. This model uses the Voigt absorption profile to obtain a correlation between the frequency of the traveling photon and the velocity of the absorbing atom. Results of computer simulations based on this model are presented along with experimental measurements. The ARF characteristics of importance include its efficiency and the temporal response of the filter. These characteristics are determined as a function of temperature and the input photon frequency. The effect of an additional buffer gas, which is included to decrease the ARF response time is investigated.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academicen_US
dc.subjectOptics.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMacleod, H. Angusen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJacobson, Michael R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShoemaker, Richard L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9123459en_US
dc.identifier.oclc709776581en_US
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