Self-efficacy and causal attributions as cognitive-motivational variables in Korean high-achieving and under-achieving students.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185398
Title:
Self-efficacy and causal attributions as cognitive-motivational variables in Korean high-achieving and under-achieving students.
Author:
Paik, Eunhee.
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Self-efficacy and causal attributions have been suggested as potential predictors of academic achievement and motivation. The few studies that have looked at the relationship between these constructs have been conducted in Western cultures. The purpose of this study was to explore self-efficacy and attributional differences between under-achieving and high-achieving Korean students in reading. Self-efficacy and causal attributions were examined in the framework of learned helplessness with 55 sixth grade Korean students. The students' self-efficacy scores in reading and persistence time on a non-academic task were analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance procedure. Students' attributional responses were analyzed using the qualitative methods. Significant differences were found between under-achieving and high-achieving students for self-efficacy and persistence time. Results revealed a positive relationship between level of achievement and self-efficacy scores in reading, and level of achievement and persistence time. Students' attributional response for their failure on the non-academic task indicated task difficulty as the primary attributional factor. No significant indices of personal learned helplessness were observed. The research findings were discussed in terms of the application of the self-efficacy and causal attribution theories cross-culturally, educational practices, and implications for future research.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic; Self-efficacy; Educational psychology
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Special Education and Rehabilitation; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Head, Daniel

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSelf-efficacy and causal attributions as cognitive-motivational variables in Korean high-achieving and under-achieving students.en_US
dc.creatorPaik, Eunhee.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPaik, Eunhee.en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSelf-efficacy and causal attributions have been suggested as potential predictors of academic achievement and motivation. The few studies that have looked at the relationship between these constructs have been conducted in Western cultures. The purpose of this study was to explore self-efficacy and attributional differences between under-achieving and high-achieving Korean students in reading. Self-efficacy and causal attributions were examined in the framework of learned helplessness with 55 sixth grade Korean students. The students' self-efficacy scores in reading and persistence time on a non-academic task were analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance procedure. Students' attributional responses were analyzed using the qualitative methods. Significant differences were found between under-achieving and high-achieving students for self-efficacy and persistence time. Results revealed a positive relationship between level of achievement and self-efficacy scores in reading, and level of achievement and persistence time. Students' attributional response for their failure on the non-academic task indicated task difficulty as the primary attributional factor. No significant indices of personal learned helplessness were observed. The research findings were discussed in terms of the application of the self-efficacy and causal attribution theories cross-culturally, educational practices, and implications for future research.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academicen_US
dc.subjectSelf-efficacyen_US
dc.subjectEducational psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education and Rehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHead, Danielen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBos, Candace S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPysh, Margareten_US
dc.identifier.proquest9123452en_US
dc.identifier.oclc709612144en_US
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