THE EFFECT OF THE "ASPIRE!" PROGRAM ON SELF-CONCEPT AND LOCUS-OF-CONTROL OF SELECTED JUNIOR AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185382
Title:
THE EFFECT OF THE "ASPIRE!" PROGRAM ON SELF-CONCEPT AND LOCUS-OF-CONTROL OF SELECTED JUNIOR AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS.
Author:
WELCH, PETER MATTHEW.
Issue Date:
1982
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Educators are beginning to realize that the apparent lack of "motivation" observed in many students may be due to a poor self-concept. The benefits of a positive self-concept are apparent in many different areas of a child's education ranging from attendance and behavior to interpersonal relations. While numerous studies support the need for a positive self-concept, the majority of leadership and motivation programs currently in existence are designed for the adult market. The "ASPIRE!" program, designed by the researcher, has been conducted in a number of secondary schools and is apparently meeting the motivational needs of the students. But, no statistical data existed to support this. The present study was undertaken to determine if the "ASPIRE!" program had any effect on helping selected secondary school students to develop a more positive self-concept and become more "internalized" in their locus-of-control. 240 students were involved in the study consisting of an equal number of male and female subjects as well as Anglo and Mexican-American subjects. The variables in this study were self-concept as measured by the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale and the Osgood Semantic Differential Scale, and locus-of-control as measured by the Rotter Locus-of-Control Scale. Demographic data was also collected. Significant differences were discovered on the measures of self-concept and locus-of-control for all subjects. It was found that the self-concept improved for all groups of students at the completion of the "ASPIRE!" program. The subjects also became more "internalized" in their locus-of-control. It was also discovered that there were no differences between males and females and Anglos and Mexican-Americans in developing a more positive self-concept. However, it was found that high socioeconomic status students and first or second born children or children from small families tended to have a more positive self-concept and be more internalized in their locus of control than other students. The findings suggest that the "ASPIRE!" program may be a useful tool in helping to improve the self-concept of junior and senior high school students.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Self-perception.; Control (Psychology); Students -- Psychology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTHE EFFECT OF THE "ASPIRE!" PROGRAM ON SELF-CONCEPT AND LOCUS-OF-CONTROL OF SELECTED JUNIOR AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS.en_US
dc.creatorWELCH, PETER MATTHEW.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWELCH, PETER MATTHEW.en_US
dc.date.issued1982en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractEducators are beginning to realize that the apparent lack of "motivation" observed in many students may be due to a poor self-concept. The benefits of a positive self-concept are apparent in many different areas of a child's education ranging from attendance and behavior to interpersonal relations. While numerous studies support the need for a positive self-concept, the majority of leadership and motivation programs currently in existence are designed for the adult market. The "ASPIRE!" program, designed by the researcher, has been conducted in a number of secondary schools and is apparently meeting the motivational needs of the students. But, no statistical data existed to support this. The present study was undertaken to determine if the "ASPIRE!" program had any effect on helping selected secondary school students to develop a more positive self-concept and become more "internalized" in their locus-of-control. 240 students were involved in the study consisting of an equal number of male and female subjects as well as Anglo and Mexican-American subjects. The variables in this study were self-concept as measured by the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale and the Osgood Semantic Differential Scale, and locus-of-control as measured by the Rotter Locus-of-Control Scale. Demographic data was also collected. Significant differences were discovered on the measures of self-concept and locus-of-control for all subjects. It was found that the self-concept improved for all groups of students at the completion of the "ASPIRE!" program. The subjects also became more "internalized" in their locus-of-control. It was also discovered that there were no differences between males and females and Anglos and Mexican-Americans in developing a more positive self-concept. However, it was found that high socioeconomic status students and first or second born children or children from small families tended to have a more positive self-concept and be more internalized in their locus of control than other students. The findings suggest that the "ASPIRE!" program may be a useful tool in helping to improve the self-concept of junior and senior high school students.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSelf-perception.en_US
dc.subjectControl (Psychology)en_US
dc.subjectStudents -- Psychology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8306463en_US
dc.identifier.oclc686762951en_US
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