Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185364
Title:
An hierarchical model for FMS control.
Author:
Sodhi, Manbir Singh
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Flexible Manufacturing Systems (FMSs) are usually composed of general purpose machines with automatic tool changing capability and integrated material handling. FMSs offer the advantages of high utilization levels and simultaneous production of a variety of part types with minimal changeover time. The complexity of FMSs however requires sophisticated control. In this dissertation a four level control hierarchy along with computationally feasible control algorithms for each level is presented. Decisions are made at each level utilizing the flexibility inherent in FMSs. The proposed scheme has the advantages of ensuring satisfaction of higher level decisions as lower level operating decisions are made, and allows performance and status data collected at lower levels to be fed back and influence future high level decisions. The top level is concerned with the choice of part types and volumes to be assigned to the FMS over the next several months. Within this horizon, production volumes are planned for each period, a period typically being between a week and a month in length. A linear programming model is used for planning at this level. The second level plans daily or shift production. Advantage is taken of the FMSs ability to be configured to respond to different part mixes to allocate tools to machines so as to minimize holding costs. Separate mathematical programming models are formulated to match various FMS environments. A heuristic for solution of a model of an automated production flexible environment is detailed. Computational results are presented. Extensions of this heuristic to other environments are outlined. The third level determines process routes for each part type in order to minimize material handling. Additional tools are loaded on machines when possible to maximize alternate routings, and using the flexibility offered by FMSs to process parts along alternate routes, routing assignments are made to minimize workload assignment. These routing assignments are used by level four for actual routing, sequencing and material handling path control. The level three model is formulated as a linear program and heuristics are used for level four. An example is provided to illustrate the completeness of the decision hierarchy and the relationships between levels.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Industrial management; Industrial engineering -- Management.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Systems and Industrial Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Askin, Ronald G.; Sen, Suvrajeet

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAn hierarchical model for FMS control.en_US
dc.creatorSodhi, Manbir Singhen_US
dc.contributor.authorSodhi, Manbir Singhen_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractFlexible Manufacturing Systems (FMSs) are usually composed of general purpose machines with automatic tool changing capability and integrated material handling. FMSs offer the advantages of high utilization levels and simultaneous production of a variety of part types with minimal changeover time. The complexity of FMSs however requires sophisticated control. In this dissertation a four level control hierarchy along with computationally feasible control algorithms for each level is presented. Decisions are made at each level utilizing the flexibility inherent in FMSs. The proposed scheme has the advantages of ensuring satisfaction of higher level decisions as lower level operating decisions are made, and allows performance and status data collected at lower levels to be fed back and influence future high level decisions. The top level is concerned with the choice of part types and volumes to be assigned to the FMS over the next several months. Within this horizon, production volumes are planned for each period, a period typically being between a week and a month in length. A linear programming model is used for planning at this level. The second level plans daily or shift production. Advantage is taken of the FMSs ability to be configured to respond to different part mixes to allocate tools to machines so as to minimize holding costs. Separate mathematical programming models are formulated to match various FMS environments. A heuristic for solution of a model of an automated production flexible environment is detailed. Computational results are presented. Extensions of this heuristic to other environments are outlined. The third level determines process routes for each part type in order to minimize material handling. Additional tools are loaded on machines when possible to maximize alternate routings, and using the flexibility offered by FMSs to process parts along alternate routes, routing assignments are made to minimize workload assignment. These routing assignments are used by level four for actual routing, sequencing and material handling path control. The level three model is formulated as a linear program and heuristics are used for level four. An example is provided to illustrate the completeness of the decision hierarchy and the relationships between levels.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectIndustrial managementen_US
dc.subjectIndustrial engineering -- Management.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSystems and Industrial Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorAskin, Ronald G.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorSen, Suvrajeeten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNeuts, Marcel F.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9121551en_US
dc.identifier.oclc681753179en_US
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