QUANTIFICATION OF BOVINE IMMUNOGLOBULIN-G, IMMUNOGLOBULIN-M, AND IMMUNOGLOBULIN-A ANTIBODIES TO CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS B-TOXIN BY ENZYME IMMUNOASSAY: SYSTEMIC EFFECTS OF MATERNALLY DERIVED ANTIBODIES ON IMMUNIZATION OF NEWBORN CALVES.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185348
Title:
QUANTIFICATION OF BOVINE IMMUNOGLOBULIN-G, IMMUNOGLOBULIN-M, AND IMMUNOGLOBULIN-A ANTIBODIES TO CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS B-TOXIN BY ENZYME IMMUNOASSAY: SYSTEMIC EFFECTS OF MATERNALLY DERIVED ANTIBODIES ON IMMUNIZATION OF NEWBORN CALVES.
Author:
FLEENOR, WILLIAM ALFORD.
Issue Date:
1982
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A quantitative competitive binding "triple sandwich" enzyme immunoassay was used to evaluate pathogen/class-specific antibody responses in Holstein-Friesian calves vaccinated against Clostridium perfringens B-toxin at various ages postpartum. Vaccination of dams at six weeks and again at two weeks prepartum increased pathogen-specific antibody levels in their colostrum and respective calf's serum. Calves initially vaccinated at three days produced both a primary and secondary pathogen-specific antibody response, whereas calves initially vaccinated at 12 and 21 days produced only secondary responses. Maternally-derived antibodies were found to suppress neonatal antibody production following primary immunization. They were also found to influence secondary humoral immune responses, although in a diminished capacity. Pathogen-specific IgG and IgM concentrations in dams' sera and colostra were found related to subsequent pathogen-specific IgG and IgM neonatal serum concentrations. Only pathogen-specific IgA in dams' colostra was correlated to neonatal levels, possibly owing to a different origin and role of this immunoglobulin class. All class-specific colostral immunoglobulin levels were related to subsequent neonatal concentrations. Based on results from this experiment, it is recommended that calves be vaccinated at three days postpartum with a booster administered at 63 days.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Cattle -- Diseases -- Prevention.; Parturition -- Immunological aspects.; Clostridium diseases -- Vaccination.; Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Animal Physiology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleQUANTIFICATION OF BOVINE IMMUNOGLOBULIN-G, IMMUNOGLOBULIN-M, AND IMMUNOGLOBULIN-A ANTIBODIES TO CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS B-TOXIN BY ENZYME IMMUNOASSAY: SYSTEMIC EFFECTS OF MATERNALLY DERIVED ANTIBODIES ON IMMUNIZATION OF NEWBORN CALVES.en_US
dc.creatorFLEENOR, WILLIAM ALFORD.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFLEENOR, WILLIAM ALFORD.en_US
dc.date.issued1982en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA quantitative competitive binding "triple sandwich" enzyme immunoassay was used to evaluate pathogen/class-specific antibody responses in Holstein-Friesian calves vaccinated against Clostridium perfringens B-toxin at various ages postpartum. Vaccination of dams at six weeks and again at two weeks prepartum increased pathogen-specific antibody levels in their colostrum and respective calf's serum. Calves initially vaccinated at three days produced both a primary and secondary pathogen-specific antibody response, whereas calves initially vaccinated at 12 and 21 days produced only secondary responses. Maternally-derived antibodies were found to suppress neonatal antibody production following primary immunization. They were also found to influence secondary humoral immune responses, although in a diminished capacity. Pathogen-specific IgG and IgM concentrations in dams' sera and colostra were found related to subsequent pathogen-specific IgG and IgM neonatal serum concentrations. Only pathogen-specific IgA in dams' colostra was correlated to neonatal levels, possibly owing to a different origin and role of this immunoglobulin class. All class-specific colostral immunoglobulin levels were related to subsequent neonatal concentrations. Based on results from this experiment, it is recommended that calves be vaccinated at three days postpartum with a booster administered at 63 days.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectCattle -- Diseases -- Prevention.en_US
dc.subjectParturition -- Immunological aspects.en_US
dc.subjectClostridium diseases -- Vaccination.en_US
dc.subjectEnzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnimal Physiologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8217411en_US
dc.identifier.oclc681958381en_US
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