Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185341
Title:
Instructional strategies and conceptual changes.
Author:
Saulawa, Danjuma Rabe
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The schema activating instructional strategy of Semantic Feature Analysis (SFA) has been demonstrated as an effective way of teaching vocabulary and comprehension. This study compared the SFA to three other strategies of Direct Instruction (DI), Vocabulary Look Up (VLU), and Read Only (RO) for their effectiveness to help students clarify prior misconceptions. Student responses on multiple choice pre and post tests and their written recalls were the dependent variables in this study. Subjects were four classes of 127 normal seventh and eighth grade students. The classes were randomly assigned intact to the four instructional strategies: SFA, DI, VLU, and RO. Students were pretested and then instructed using a passage on the Fourth Amendment of the U. S. Constitution according to their assigned strategies. They then took the posttest and wrote recalls. Students misconceptions in the pretest were tabulated and compared to those in the posttest to determine which of the four strategies was most effective in helping students clarify their prior misconceptions about the Fourth Amendment. Then students' written recalls were analyzed according to various conceptual categories to learn which strategy helped the students to recall the reading passage. The structure of the students' writing was also examined to find out which of the four strategies helped the students the most in integrating the new information and writing most coherently. The SFA group clarified and corrected significantly more items on the multiple choice test than any of the other groups. This finding suggests that an interactive strategy such as SFA facilitates student memory and learning of content area material. The results also demonstrated that students taught through the strategy of semantic feature analysis recalled more conceptual units than the other groups. They also wrote more cohesively with clearer structure than the others.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic; Education, Elementary; Reading comprehension.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Teaching and Teacher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Cox, Vivian

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleInstructional strategies and conceptual changes.en_US
dc.creatorSaulawa, Danjuma Rabeen_US
dc.contributor.authorSaulawa, Danjuma Rabeen_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe schema activating instructional strategy of Semantic Feature Analysis (SFA) has been demonstrated as an effective way of teaching vocabulary and comprehension. This study compared the SFA to three other strategies of Direct Instruction (DI), Vocabulary Look Up (VLU), and Read Only (RO) for their effectiveness to help students clarify prior misconceptions. Student responses on multiple choice pre and post tests and their written recalls were the dependent variables in this study. Subjects were four classes of 127 normal seventh and eighth grade students. The classes were randomly assigned intact to the four instructional strategies: SFA, DI, VLU, and RO. Students were pretested and then instructed using a passage on the Fourth Amendment of the U. S. Constitution according to their assigned strategies. They then took the posttest and wrote recalls. Students misconceptions in the pretest were tabulated and compared to those in the posttest to determine which of the four strategies was most effective in helping students clarify their prior misconceptions about the Fourth Amendment. Then students' written recalls were analyzed according to various conceptual categories to learn which strategy helped the students to recall the reading passage. The structure of the students' writing was also examined to find out which of the four strategies helped the students the most in integrating the new information and writing most coherently. The SFA group clarified and corrected significantly more items on the multiple choice test than any of the other groups. This finding suggests that an interactive strategy such as SFA facilitates student memory and learning of content area material. The results also demonstrated that students taught through the strategy of semantic feature analysis recalled more conceptual units than the other groups. They also wrote more cohesively with clearer structure than the others.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academicen_US
dc.subjectEducation, Elementaryen_US
dc.subjectReading comprehension.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTeaching and Teacher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCox, Vivianen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAnders, Patricia L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGoodman, Kennethen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGoodman, Yettaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9117467en_US
dc.identifier.oclc708455218en_US
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