The politics of water in the Southwest: Policy patterns of water elites in Southern California and Arizona.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185338
Title:
The politics of water in the Southwest: Policy patterns of water elites in Southern California and Arizona.
Author:
Parsons, William Wesley.
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The political patterns of Western water policy are best explained as cooperation among the few, or "elites". The extent of elitism is demonstrated across four eras of Western water policy, the Foundation of Elites (1880s-1920s); the Emergence of Elites (1920s-1930s); the Golden Age of concrete (1930s-1960s); and the Era of Diminishing Returns (1970s- Present). The four phases test for elitism in a three step process. First, California and Arizona water politics serve as case studies to distinguish between elite and non-elite water interests. Second, the magnitude of elite control over Western water policy is tied to the "geopolitical" importance of the Colorado River. Over time Los Angeles' interests have come to dominate water policy in the Southwest. Third, change away from elitism to a more equitable political environment is explored. Alternatives include pluralism, liberalism, and idealism. These options offer insight on how change away from elite politics might effect Western water policy in the nineties.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Water -- Political aspects -- California; Water -- Political aspects -- Arizona; Water resources development -- West (U.S.)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Political Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ingram, Helen

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe politics of water in the Southwest: Policy patterns of water elites in Southern California and Arizona.en_US
dc.creatorParsons, William Wesley.en_US
dc.contributor.authorParsons, William Wesley.en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe political patterns of Western water policy are best explained as cooperation among the few, or "elites". The extent of elitism is demonstrated across four eras of Western water policy, the Foundation of Elites (1880s-1920s); the Emergence of Elites (1920s-1930s); the Golden Age of concrete (1930s-1960s); and the Era of Diminishing Returns (1970s- Present). The four phases test for elitism in a three step process. First, California and Arizona water politics serve as case studies to distinguish between elite and non-elite water interests. Second, the magnitude of elite control over Western water policy is tied to the "geopolitical" importance of the Colorado River. Over time Los Angeles' interests have come to dominate water policy in the Southwest. Third, change away from elitism to a more equitable political environment is explored. Alternatives include pluralism, liberalism, and idealism. These options offer insight on how change away from elite politics might effect Western water policy in the nineties.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectWater -- Political aspects -- Californiaen_US
dc.subjectWater -- Political aspects -- Arizonaen_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- West (U.S.)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorIngram, Helen-
dc.contributor.committeememberGregg, Frank-
dc.contributor.committeememberKenski, Henry C.-
dc.contributor.committeememberBradley, Michael-
dc.identifier.proquest9117464en_US
dc.identifier.oclc706499129en_US
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