The economic role of Szechwan in Sung times (A.D. 960-1279): The case of the tea and horse exchange.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185331
Title:
The economic role of Szechwan in Sung times (A.D. 960-1279): The case of the tea and horse exchange.
Author:
Chan, Penny Yan Yan.
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This is an historical survey of the economic role of Szechwan during Sung times (A.D. 960-1279). The tea and horse exchange was taken as a case to test the thesis that the economic policies implemented in Szechwan by the Sung government were a means to strengthen its defensive power. Although this is not an exploratory study on the role of the tea and horse exchange during Sung times, this study attempts to present its operation in a new and realistic perspective. Modern Western and Chinese scholars share the viewpoint that the expansion of the Sung to Szechwan was based upon an imperialistic motivation. The tea and horse exchange was a typical example of capitalizing upon the Szechwan resources and colonizing the minorities there. However, based on historical evidence, this study assumes that basically the Sung government wanted to maintain peace. Through the implementation of the tea and horse exchange, it was able to achieve a peaceful ethnic relationship in the southwest frontier. Some economic improvements were seen in the southwest minority areas after the exchange. Moreover, horses could be obtained, which were used, to a certain extent, to strengthen the Sung's military power although there were some problems. There are two major parts in this study. The first part attempts to present the general importance of Szechwan. It presents a prosperous picture of Szechwan on the eve of the establishment of the Sung dynasty. Due to the socio-economic heritage in Szechwan, special economic policies were implemented there by the Sung government in order to encourage further development, which could support its military. Some major policies are discussed in this part. In the second part, there is a study of the problem of the shortage of horses for military use, resulting in the implementation of the tea and horse exchange. The impact of the exchange on frontier relations and on Sung's military power and economic development as a whole are also discussed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Economics; Sociology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
East Asian Studies; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Tao, Jing-shen

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe economic role of Szechwan in Sung times (A.D. 960-1279): The case of the tea and horse exchange.en_US
dc.creatorChan, Penny Yan Yan.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, Penny Yan Yan.en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis is an historical survey of the economic role of Szechwan during Sung times (A.D. 960-1279). The tea and horse exchange was taken as a case to test the thesis that the economic policies implemented in Szechwan by the Sung government were a means to strengthen its defensive power. Although this is not an exploratory study on the role of the tea and horse exchange during Sung times, this study attempts to present its operation in a new and realistic perspective. Modern Western and Chinese scholars share the viewpoint that the expansion of the Sung to Szechwan was based upon an imperialistic motivation. The tea and horse exchange was a typical example of capitalizing upon the Szechwan resources and colonizing the minorities there. However, based on historical evidence, this study assumes that basically the Sung government wanted to maintain peace. Through the implementation of the tea and horse exchange, it was able to achieve a peaceful ethnic relationship in the southwest frontier. Some economic improvements were seen in the southwest minority areas after the exchange. Moreover, horses could be obtained, which were used, to a certain extent, to strengthen the Sung's military power although there were some problems. There are two major parts in this study. The first part attempts to present the general importance of Szechwan. It presents a prosperous picture of Szechwan on the eve of the establishment of the Sung dynasty. Due to the socio-economic heritage in Szechwan, special economic policies were implemented there by the Sung government in order to encourage further development, which could support its military. Some major policies are discussed in this part. In the second part, there is a study of the problem of the shortage of horses for military use, resulting in the implementation of the tea and horse exchange. The impact of the exchange on frontier relations and on Sung's military power and economic development as a whole are also discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEconomicsen_US
dc.subjectSociology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEast Asian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorTao, Jing-shenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchultz, Williamen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHedtke, Charlesen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9117457en_US
dc.identifier.oclc710848143en_US
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