Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185330
Title:
Career decision-making of Thai and American college students.
Author:
Bungamongkon, Nit
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this research was to test two null hypotheses: (1) there will be no significant differences in career decision-making between Thai and American college students, and (2) there will be no significant relationship in career decision-making within the Thai and American college students in regard to: (1) gender, (2) their parental socioeconomic status as implied by the father's occupation, (3) self-efficacy, (4) interest, (5) sex-role orientation, (6) occupational expectations, (7) occupational aspirations, and (8) career certainty. Three measures were used in addition to demographic data: (1) a measure of career decision-making, (2) a measure of self-efficacy, and (3) a measure of sex-role orientation. The sample of this study were undergraduate students who enrolled in Introduction to Psychology classes at Khon Kaen University, Thailand, in 1990 and American undergraduate and graduate students who enrolled in Basic Skills in Counseling classes at the University of Arizona, U.S.A., in 1990. Each subject was asked to fill out the three questionnaires. T-test analysis was used to address the first hypothesis. Multiple Regression Analysis was used to determine how well gender, parental occupations, self-efficacy, interest, sex-role orientation, occupational expectations, occupational aspirations, and career certainty could predict the dependent variable career decision-making to address the second hypothesis. For career decision-making, the Thai students showed higher indecision than the American college students. Finally, the predictor variables of this research were not able to predict the Thai students' career decision-making.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Foundations and Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Aleamoni, Lawrence M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCareer decision-making of Thai and American college students.en_US
dc.creatorBungamongkon, Niten_US
dc.contributor.authorBungamongkon, Niten_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this research was to test two null hypotheses: (1) there will be no significant differences in career decision-making between Thai and American college students, and (2) there will be no significant relationship in career decision-making within the Thai and American college students in regard to: (1) gender, (2) their parental socioeconomic status as implied by the father's occupation, (3) self-efficacy, (4) interest, (5) sex-role orientation, (6) occupational expectations, (7) occupational aspirations, and (8) career certainty. Three measures were used in addition to demographic data: (1) a measure of career decision-making, (2) a measure of self-efficacy, and (3) a measure of sex-role orientation. The sample of this study were undergraduate students who enrolled in Introduction to Psychology classes at Khon Kaen University, Thailand, in 1990 and American undergraduate and graduate students who enrolled in Basic Skills in Counseling classes at the University of Arizona, U.S.A., in 1990. Each subject was asked to fill out the three questionnaires. T-test analysis was used to address the first hypothesis. Multiple Regression Analysis was used to determine how well gender, parental occupations, self-efficacy, interest, sex-role orientation, occupational expectations, occupational aspirations, and career certainty could predict the dependent variable career decision-making to address the second hypothesis. For career decision-making, the Thai students showed higher indecision than the American college students. Finally, the predictor variables of this research were not able to predict the Thai students' career decision-making.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Foundations and Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorAleamoni, Lawrence M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMishra, Shitala P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLauver, Philip J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9117456en_US
dc.identifier.oclc710848451en_US
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