Word processing: The effect on the type of revisions made by young writers.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185325
Title:
Word processing: The effect on the type of revisions made by young writers.
Author:
Stock, Lynette Marie.
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Research studies conducted where word processing programs were used for composition and revision indicate that computers affect the way writers at all maturity levels compose and revise. Student writers, as a rule, are not given an opportunity to use word processing for composing since many schools are not equipped with enough computer terminals to allow for extensive use of word processing by teachers in their writing programs. However, when student writers are able to use word processing, research indicates they are motivated to spend more time writing, they have a better attitude about revising, and they begin to understand that one draft does not represent a finished product. These three findings would indicate that word processing is a positive alternative to the traditional paper and pencil composition instruction used to teach writing and revising. Encouraged by the positive results of previous research findings, this study was constructed to provide a group of young writers with intensive writing practice using the APPLEWORKS word processing system. The goal of the study was to build on the motivational aspects of computer use and to determine if combining it with use of word processing software would encourage higher level revision strategies to develop in student writers. A variety of writing topics were presented to two groups of seventh grade students and three levels of revisions (mechanical, structural and conceptual) were monitored during one school semester. The importance of revising was stressed to both groups, and students were encouraged to revise often and get feedback on each revision. A higher incidence of structural and/or conceptual revisions to a composition would indicate a shift in revision strategy, since student writers primarily focus on mechanical revision. Structural revisions made by the word processing group showed a significant change that was not evident in the group writing with paper and pencil. This would indicate the use of word processing does impact levels of revision with student writers. A questionnaire is also included in the study. It was designed to gauge a student's perception of the revision process as a result of the study.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Teaching and Teacher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Clark, Donald C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleWord processing: The effect on the type of revisions made by young writers.en_US
dc.creatorStock, Lynette Marie.en_US
dc.contributor.authorStock, Lynette Marie.en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractResearch studies conducted where word processing programs were used for composition and revision indicate that computers affect the way writers at all maturity levels compose and revise. Student writers, as a rule, are not given an opportunity to use word processing for composing since many schools are not equipped with enough computer terminals to allow for extensive use of word processing by teachers in their writing programs. However, when student writers are able to use word processing, research indicates they are motivated to spend more time writing, they have a better attitude about revising, and they begin to understand that one draft does not represent a finished product. These three findings would indicate that word processing is a positive alternative to the traditional paper and pencil composition instruction used to teach writing and revising. Encouraged by the positive results of previous research findings, this study was constructed to provide a group of young writers with intensive writing practice using the APPLEWORKS word processing system. The goal of the study was to build on the motivational aspects of computer use and to determine if combining it with use of word processing software would encourage higher level revision strategies to develop in student writers. A variety of writing topics were presented to two groups of seventh grade students and three levels of revisions (mechanical, structural and conceptual) were monitored during one school semester. The importance of revising was stressed to both groups, and students were encouraged to revise often and get feedback on each revision. A higher incidence of structural and/or conceptual revisions to a composition would indicate a shift in revision strategy, since student writers primarily focus on mechanical revision. Structural revisions made by the word processing group showed a significant change that was not evident in the group writing with paper and pencil. This would indicate the use of word processing does impact levels of revision with student writers. A questionnaire is also included in the study. It was designed to gauge a student's perception of the revision process as a result of the study.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTeaching and Teacher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorClark, Donald C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9114073en_US
dc.identifier.oclc709925938en_US
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