Patterns of Arizona high schools' organization and use of instructional microcomputers

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185310
Title:
Patterns of Arizona high schools' organization and use of instructional microcomputers
Author:
Grey, Jeremie Hill
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to investigate the patterns of organization and use of microcomputers in Arizona high schools. More specifically, the study was designed to determine the number and types of instructional computing applications being used in Arizona high schools, the level and types of system support for microcomputers, the amount and types of training for faculty and students using microcomputers, the number and types of equipment commonly used, the arrangement and control of microcomputer facilities, and the availability and use by faculty and students. A survey instrument was used to gather data from the target population, which consisted of librarians, principals, and/or computer coordinators from 150 public high schools in Arizona. These three groups were viewed as equivalent sources of information for the purposes of this study. The survey questionnaire was reviewed by a sample of librarians, principals, and computer coordinators for completeness and feasibility. The procedures used for testing the eight hypotheses were (1) Pearson product moment correlation coefficients and (2) frequency distributions. Significant results were found for the analysis of data of one hypothesis. Student use of microcomputers increased with the number of computers available for use by all students. Findings also included information about the most common computing applications, dedicated support for microcomputers, amounts and types of training for faculty and students, and arrangement and use of microcomputers within Arizona high schools. Recommendations for additional investigation were included.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Teaching and Teacher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Clark, Donald C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePatterns of Arizona high schools' organization and use of instructional microcomputersen_US
dc.creatorGrey, Jeremie Hillen_US
dc.contributor.authorGrey, Jeremie Hillen_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to investigate the patterns of organization and use of microcomputers in Arizona high schools. More specifically, the study was designed to determine the number and types of instructional computing applications being used in Arizona high schools, the level and types of system support for microcomputers, the amount and types of training for faculty and students using microcomputers, the number and types of equipment commonly used, the arrangement and control of microcomputer facilities, and the availability and use by faculty and students. A survey instrument was used to gather data from the target population, which consisted of librarians, principals, and/or computer coordinators from 150 public high schools in Arizona. These three groups were viewed as equivalent sources of information for the purposes of this study. The survey questionnaire was reviewed by a sample of librarians, principals, and computer coordinators for completeness and feasibility. The procedures used for testing the eight hypotheses were (1) Pearson product moment correlation coefficients and (2) frequency distributions. Significant results were found for the analysis of data of one hypothesis. Student use of microcomputers increased with the number of computers available for use by all students. Findings also included information about the most common computing applications, dedicated support for microcomputers, amounts and types of training for faculty and students, and arrangement and use of microcomputers within Arizona high schools. Recommendations for additional investigation were included.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTeaching and Teacher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorClark, Donald C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPate, Glenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJohnson, Christopheren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAleamoni, Lawrence M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9114058en_US
dc.identifier.oclc709923957en_US
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