OUTCOME EXPECTANCY, SELF-PERCEIVED EFFICACY AND BEHAVIOR PERFORMANCE.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185293
Title:
OUTCOME EXPECTANCY, SELF-PERCEIVED EFFICACY AND BEHAVIOR PERFORMANCE.
Author:
DALEY, JOHN ANTHONY.
Issue Date:
1982
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A systematic investigation of the human mind's ability to self-reflect and create private interpretations of sensory data has been handicapped for years by conceptual prejudice and methodological bias. Until the arrival of the cognitive behavior therapists, little empirical attention was directed to the development of a methodology adequate enough to investigate the influence that distorted cognitive interpretations have on emotional arousal and inhibited behavioral performance. This study investigated these self-reflective mental capabilities in terms of outcome expectancies which were conceptualized in terms of guilt, and self-perceptions of performance ability which were conceptualized in terms of successfully refusing unreasonable requests. It was hypothesized that guilt entails both emotional arousal as well as the distorted and fabricated cognitive perceptions of tragic expectation, causal attribution and self-perceived helplessness and that these perceptions influence behavioral performance and self-perceptions of performance ability. It was also hypothesized that guilt relates significantly to resentment and depression. Seventy-three subjects volunteered to participate: fifty-eight women and fifteen men with a mean age of thirty-three. Subjects responded to both self-report questionnaires and open-ended self-report interviews. Seven independent raters judged the participant's responses to eight tape recorded stimulus situations to determine to what extent the responses fit the hypothesized categories. A stepwise multiple regression was used to analyze the data. The results were summarized and placed in tables. The results of the study supported the five hypotheses developed to test the general question.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
United States. Office of Management and Budget -- Rules and practice.; Security clearances -- United States.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Counseling and Guidance; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleOUTCOME EXPECTANCY, SELF-PERCEIVED EFFICACY AND BEHAVIOR PERFORMANCE.en_US
dc.creatorDALEY, JOHN ANTHONY.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDALEY, JOHN ANTHONY.en_US
dc.date.issued1982en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA systematic investigation of the human mind's ability to self-reflect and create private interpretations of sensory data has been handicapped for years by conceptual prejudice and methodological bias. Until the arrival of the cognitive behavior therapists, little empirical attention was directed to the development of a methodology adequate enough to investigate the influence that distorted cognitive interpretations have on emotional arousal and inhibited behavioral performance. This study investigated these self-reflective mental capabilities in terms of outcome expectancies which were conceptualized in terms of guilt, and self-perceptions of performance ability which were conceptualized in terms of successfully refusing unreasonable requests. It was hypothesized that guilt entails both emotional arousal as well as the distorted and fabricated cognitive perceptions of tragic expectation, causal attribution and self-perceived helplessness and that these perceptions influence behavioral performance and self-perceptions of performance ability. It was also hypothesized that guilt relates significantly to resentment and depression. Seventy-three subjects volunteered to participate: fifty-eight women and fifteen men with a mean age of thirty-three. Subjects responded to both self-report questionnaires and open-ended self-report interviews. Seven independent raters judged the participant's responses to eight tape recorded stimulus situations to determine to what extent the responses fit the hypothesized categories. A stepwise multiple regression was used to analyze the data. The results were summarized and placed in tables. The results of the study supported the five hypotheses developed to test the general question.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectUnited States. Office of Management and Budget -- Rules and practice.en_US
dc.subjectSecurity clearances -- United States.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCounseling and Guidanceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8306453en_US
dc.identifier.oclc426071365en_US
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