Embodied consumption of U.S. copper and sulfur: Implications for intensity of use estimation and forecasting.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185277
Title:
Embodied consumption of U.S. copper and sulfur: Implications for intensity of use estimation and forecasting.
Author:
Al-Rawahy, Khalid Hilal.
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Domestic mineral consumption is defined as a net sum of apparent consumption plus embodied mineral contained in net imported goods. The U.S. is a net importer of copper-containing products, such as automobiles, electrical products, and construction and industrial machinery. Embodied copper which is contained in net imports of these products constitute part of domestic copper consumption. On the other hand, the U.S. is a net exporter of sulfur-using/embodying products, such as fertilizers and grains. The sulfur which is contained/employed in manufacturing exported products is not actually part of domestic sulfur consumption. Net embodied U.S. imports (exports) of copper (sulfur) are estimated. For copper, it is shown that domestic U.S. consumption is understated and increasing, intensity of use is constant rather than decreasing, and, in general, forecast increases in domestic consumption of copper are due mainly to embodied copper imports. For sulfur, it is shown that domestic consumption is overstated and declining; domestic intensity of use is also declining. The domestic copper and sulfur industries will be differentially impacted as a result of this increased reliance on overseas markets.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Sulfur industry -- United States; Sulfur -- Economic aspects -- United States; Sulfur industry -- United States -- Forecasting; Sulfur -- Economic aspects -- United States -- Forecasting.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Mining and Geological Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rieber, Michael

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEmbodied consumption of U.S. copper and sulfur: Implications for intensity of use estimation and forecasting.en_US
dc.creatorAl-Rawahy, Khalid Hilal.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAl-Rawahy, Khalid Hilal.en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDomestic mineral consumption is defined as a net sum of apparent consumption plus embodied mineral contained in net imported goods. The U.S. is a net importer of copper-containing products, such as automobiles, electrical products, and construction and industrial machinery. Embodied copper which is contained in net imports of these products constitute part of domestic copper consumption. On the other hand, the U.S. is a net exporter of sulfur-using/embodying products, such as fertilizers and grains. The sulfur which is contained/employed in manufacturing exported products is not actually part of domestic sulfur consumption. Net embodied U.S. imports (exports) of copper (sulfur) are estimated. For copper, it is shown that domestic U.S. consumption is understated and increasing, intensity of use is constant rather than decreasing, and, in general, forecast increases in domestic consumption of copper are due mainly to embodied copper imports. For sulfur, it is shown that domestic consumption is overstated and declining; domestic intensity of use is also declining. The domestic copper and sulfur industries will be differentially impacted as a result of this increased reliance on overseas markets.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSulfur industry -- United Statesen_US
dc.subjectSulfur -- Economic aspects -- United Statesen_US
dc.subjectSulfur industry -- United States -- Forecastingen_US
dc.subjectSulfur -- Economic aspects -- United States -- Forecasting.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMining and Geological Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRieber, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHarris, DeVerleen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNewcomb, Richarden_US
dc.identifier.proquest9111962en_US
dc.identifier.oclc706137777en_US
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