Text annotation and underlining as metacognitive strategies to improve comprehension and retention of expository text.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185254
Title:
Text annotation and underlining as metacognitive strategies to improve comprehension and retention of expository text.
Author:
Harris, June.
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to examine the effects on reading comprehension and information retention of training in two text processing methods, annotation and underlining. Subjects in the study were 67 students in four study skills classes. The four groups were divided as follows: One group received training in annotation of text, and one group received training in underlining main ideas. Both these groups and one of the control groups wrote recalls immediately following the reading of two text passages, a science passage and a history passage. A fourth group, also a control group, read both passages but did not write recalls. All groups were given multiple choice pretests and posttests over the information in the passages. All groups wrote delayed recalls of the information four weeks after the initial readings. Recalls were scored by raters who used the Mitchell-Irwin Retelling Profile (1990). Scores for the multiple choice pre- and posttests were analyzed using ANOVAs; data from the recalls were analyzed using t tests to compare groups. Findings of the study indicated that there were significant effects based on the recall scores for both treatment groups over the control group which did not write recalls. The scores for the control group which did write recalls were the highest of the four groups, however. These findings suggest that writing in connection with reading offers benefits to students in comprehension and retention not offered by reading alone. Further, students who self-select study strategies which include a reading-writing component may derive the greatest of those benefits. Implications for further study include recommendations for replication of the study including an annotation group and an underlining group which do not write recalls, in addition to the four groups used here, in order to test the effects of written recalls on comprehension and retention.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Language, Reading and Culture; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Allen, Adela A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleText annotation and underlining as metacognitive strategies to improve comprehension and retention of expository text.en_US
dc.creatorHarris, June.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHarris, June.en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to examine the effects on reading comprehension and information retention of training in two text processing methods, annotation and underlining. Subjects in the study were 67 students in four study skills classes. The four groups were divided as follows: One group received training in annotation of text, and one group received training in underlining main ideas. Both these groups and one of the control groups wrote recalls immediately following the reading of two text passages, a science passage and a history passage. A fourth group, also a control group, read both passages but did not write recalls. All groups were given multiple choice pretests and posttests over the information in the passages. All groups wrote delayed recalls of the information four weeks after the initial readings. Recalls were scored by raters who used the Mitchell-Irwin Retelling Profile (1990). Scores for the multiple choice pre- and posttests were analyzed using ANOVAs; data from the recalls were analyzed using t tests to compare groups. Findings of the study indicated that there were significant effects based on the recall scores for both treatment groups over the control group which did not write recalls. The scores for the control group which did write recalls were the highest of the four groups, however. These findings suggest that writing in connection with reading offers benefits to students in comprehension and retention not offered by reading alone. Further, students who self-select study strategies which include a reading-writing component may derive the greatest of those benefits. Implications for further study include recommendations for replication of the study including an annotation group and an underlining group which do not write recalls, in addition to the four groups used here, in order to test the effects of written recalls on comprehension and retention.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading and Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorAllen, Adela A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMitchell, Judyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRankin, Jamesen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9111940en_US
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