Organization of household labor in agroforestry systems: Philippine cases.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185236
Title:
Organization of household labor in agroforestry systems: Philippine cases.
Author:
Botengan, Mary Ann Pollisco.
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Agroforestry, though old as man, is a relatively new concept in land and natural resource management. Agroforestry "offers a means of bringing the activities of rural people into greater harmony with the environment by developing a complementary association between trees and agricultural crops" (Ffolliott and Thames, 1983). The capabilities of a people to sustain a system is a fundamental knowledge that resource managers should be equipped with. This study specifically investigated on household labor allocation in three different agroforestry systems, to qualitatively determine whether agroforestry is a viable natural resource management alternative that provides a compromise to government interests of conserving the natural resources, and supplementing and/or providing for a people's needs; and to establish the capabilities of a people to sustain agroforestry by analyzing household labor allocation patterns. The study was conducted in the Northern Philippines and data was gathered summer of 1989. Primary data gathering techniques were utilized, as well as secondary data. Agroforestry was found to be a viable land and natural resource management alternative. However, while natural resources are being managed, certain considerations should be made on: historical antecedents that give rise to the manner by which agroforestry is practiced, existing land use practices, and human activities present in the area. Aside from biophysical constraints, household labor allocation largely explains the nature of the agroforestry system. Labor allocation in Barangay Ambassador is flexible, and is affected by the availability of household labor, and the nature of the activities engaged in by the households, as well as the importance attached to the cited activities.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology; Sociology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Renewable Natural Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ffolliott, Peter F.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleOrganization of household labor in agroforestry systems: Philippine cases.en_US
dc.creatorBotengan, Mary Ann Pollisco.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBotengan, Mary Ann Pollisco.en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAgroforestry, though old as man, is a relatively new concept in land and natural resource management. Agroforestry "offers a means of bringing the activities of rural people into greater harmony with the environment by developing a complementary association between trees and agricultural crops" (Ffolliott and Thames, 1983). The capabilities of a people to sustain a system is a fundamental knowledge that resource managers should be equipped with. This study specifically investigated on household labor allocation in three different agroforestry systems, to qualitatively determine whether agroforestry is a viable natural resource management alternative that provides a compromise to government interests of conserving the natural resources, and supplementing and/or providing for a people's needs; and to establish the capabilities of a people to sustain agroforestry by analyzing household labor allocation patterns. The study was conducted in the Northern Philippines and data was gathered summer of 1989. Primary data gathering techniques were utilized, as well as secondary data. Agroforestry was found to be a viable land and natural resource management alternative. However, while natural resources are being managed, certain considerations should be made on: historical antecedents that give rise to the manner by which agroforestry is practiced, existing land use practices, and human activities present in the area. Aside from biophysical constraints, household labor allocation largely explains the nature of the agroforestry system. Labor allocation in Barangay Ambassador is flexible, and is affected by the availability of household labor, and the nature of the activities engaged in by the households, as well as the importance attached to the cited activities.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropologyen_US
dc.subjectSociology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFfolliott, Peter F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFogel, Martin M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGuertin, D. Phillipen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFinan, Timothy J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVelez-Ibanez, Carlosen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9111925en_US
dc.identifier.oclc710218669en_US
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