Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185202
Title:
Grading students' writing in college English: A history.
Author:
Kinder, Rose Marie.
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Since the classical era of education, the evaluation of written compositions has been an important responsibility of teachers, and written compositions have had some bearing on the ranking of students within both class and institution. In the late nineteenth century, composition-teaching and the ranking of students' work merged in the freshman composition courses in this country. The merger has obscured the controversies attending composition-teaching and ranking, and has contributed to a continuing emphasis on the surface details of writing. Teachers' attitudes about ranking, overlooked by most researchers, reveal a common tendency to emphasize concern for the students' attitude about writing and concern for the student-teacher relationship, above any need or desire to rank. Together their recommendations create consistent criteria that teachers may follow and suggest that ranking does not belong in the freshman composition classroom.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
English; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Roen, Duane

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleGrading students' writing in college English: A history.en_US
dc.creatorKinder, Rose Marie.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKinder, Rose Marie.en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSince the classical era of education, the evaluation of written compositions has been an important responsibility of teachers, and written compositions have had some bearing on the ranking of students within both class and institution. In the late nineteenth century, composition-teaching and the ranking of students' work merged in the freshman composition courses in this country. The merger has obscured the controversies attending composition-teaching and ranking, and has contributed to a continuing emphasis on the surface details of writing. Teachers' attitudes about ranking, overlooked by most researchers, reveal a common tendency to emphasize concern for the students' attitude about writing and concern for the student-teacher relationship, above any need or desire to rank. Together their recommendations create consistent criteria that teachers may follow and suggest that ranking does not belong in the freshman composition classroom.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRoen, Duaneen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEnos, Theresaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMiller, Thomasen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9105908en_US
dc.identifier.oclc708660402en_US
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