Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185199
Title:
Ion beam polishing of diamond films.
Author:
Grogan, Daniel Francis.
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Emerging deposition technologies now permit the nucleation and growth of diamond films on a variety of substrates, bestowing on them the extraordinary mechanical, chemical, thermal, and electrical properties of diamond. However, the diamond films invariably suffer from great surface roughness and attendant optical scatter which preclude their use in most optical applications. To be useful optically, these films must be polished. In this work, diamond films deposited by microwave-assisted chemical vapor deposition on silicon substrates have been polished by a beam of 500 eV oxygen ions with the use of spin-coated planarizing overcoat. The overcoat was developed to have the same ion-beam etch rate as the diamond films at the planarizing angle. The films' surface roughness was reduced from in excess of 1 μm (rms) and 6 μm (peak-to-valley), to 35 nm (rms) and 217 nm (peak-to valley). The polished films retained their diamond character and surface contamination was not detected. This polishing process makes optical applications in the near-infrared realizable for these diamond films.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Engineering; Physics.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Optical Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Macleod, H. Angus

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleIon beam polishing of diamond films.en_US
dc.creatorGrogan, Daniel Francis.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGrogan, Daniel Francis.en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractEmerging deposition technologies now permit the nucleation and growth of diamond films on a variety of substrates, bestowing on them the extraordinary mechanical, chemical, thermal, and electrical properties of diamond. However, the diamond films invariably suffer from great surface roughness and attendant optical scatter which preclude their use in most optical applications. To be useful optically, these films must be polished. In this work, diamond films deposited by microwave-assisted chemical vapor deposition on silicon substrates have been polished by a beam of 500 eV oxygen ions with the use of spin-coated planarizing overcoat. The overcoat was developed to have the same ion-beam etch rate as the diamond films at the planarizing angle. The films' surface roughness was reduced from in excess of 1 μm (rms) and 6 μm (peak-to-valley), to 35 nm (rms) and 217 nm (peak-to valley). The polished films retained their diamond character and surface contamination was not detected. This polishing process makes optical applications in the near-infrared realizable for these diamond films.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEngineeringen_US
dc.subjectPhysics.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMacleod, H. Angusen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBovard, Bertrand G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBurke, Jamesen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9105905en_US
dc.identifier.oclc709792118en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.