Crystallization from supercritical fluids; application to pharmaceutical and biochemical compounds.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185194
Title:
Crystallization from supercritical fluids; application to pharmaceutical and biochemical compounds.
Author:
Tavana-Roudsari, Aria.
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Crystallization from supercritical fluids was studied as a nontoxic, noncontaminating alternative to conventional techniques for purification and size manipulation of pharmaceutical solids. To proceed with crystallization solubilities of several pharmaceutical compounds in supercritical carbon dioxide were experimentally determined and modeled using solid-vapor phase equilibria. The compounds studied included benzoic acid, salicylic acid, aspirin, griseofulvin, and digoxin among others. A high pressure crystallizer was constructed and operated in batch and continuous modes. Supersaturation was generated by various schemes, such as optimal pressure reduction and salting-out. It was determined that, depending on the crystallization scheme, particles can be produced at submicron as well as large sizes. Particle nucleation and growth rates from saturated supercritical solutions were estimated and the product size distributions were simulated using the population balance theory. Observations were made regarding habit and morphology of particles nucleated and grown at supercritical conditions.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Chemistry; Engineering.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Chemical Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Randolph, A.D

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCrystallization from supercritical fluids; application to pharmaceutical and biochemical compounds.en_US
dc.creatorTavana-Roudsari, Aria.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTavana-Roudsari, Aria.en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractCrystallization from supercritical fluids was studied as a nontoxic, noncontaminating alternative to conventional techniques for purification and size manipulation of pharmaceutical solids. To proceed with crystallization solubilities of several pharmaceutical compounds in supercritical carbon dioxide were experimentally determined and modeled using solid-vapor phase equilibria. The compounds studied included benzoic acid, salicylic acid, aspirin, griseofulvin, and digoxin among others. A high pressure crystallizer was constructed and operated in batch and continuous modes. Supersaturation was generated by various schemes, such as optimal pressure reduction and salting-out. It was determined that, depending on the crystallization scheme, particles can be produced at submicron as well as large sizes. Particle nucleation and growth rates from saturated supercritical solutions were estimated and the product size distributions were simulated using the population balance theory. Observations were made regarding habit and morphology of particles nucleated and grown at supercritical conditions.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectChemistryen_US
dc.subjectEngineering.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRandolph, A.Den_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShadman, F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGuzman-Zamudio, R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9103054en_US
dc.identifier.oclc709779936en_US
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