Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185167
Title:
Memory impairment associated with stroke and aphasia.
Author:
Beeson, Pelagie Maritz.
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Brain structures in the perisylvian region that are critical for language also subserve verbal memory processes. Researchers have documented a reduction in verbal memory span in individuals with perisylvian stroke resulting in aphasia, but scant data are available regarding the integrity of long-term memory in such individuals. Whereas dissociated memory processes have been documented in nonaphasic populations, characteristic patterns of short- versus long-term memory have not typically been associated with specific lesion sites in aphasic individuals. The purpose of this study was to examine memory abilities of aphasic individuals in relation to site of neurological lesion resulting from cerebrovascular accident. Fourteen individuals with stroke and aphasia and fourteen demographically matched control subjects were given selected tests of short-term memory (STM) and long-term memory (LTM). The stroke patients represented two distinct groups with regard to site of neurological lesion: seven with anterior lesions, seven with posterior lesions. STM was assessed with Digits Forward and Tapping Forward subtests from the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (Wechsler, 1988). Verbal LTM was assessed using two multitrial free recall paradigms. One paradigm required free recall of a word list presented aurally with selective reminding of unrecalled items. The other required free and cued recall of a word list presented with guided semantic encoding. Stroke patients were impaired relative to normal control subjects on tests of verbal memory, with greater impairment of LTM associated with anterior lesions and greater impairment of STM associated with posterior lesions. Individuals with anterior lesions were deficient in the enactment of successful LTM encoding and retrieval strategies. The posterior aphasia group was most impaired for digit span, a task dependent upon subvocal rehearsal. There were no group differences on a test of visual short-term memory. Verbal memory performance did not correlate highly with language ability, and did not appear to be simply a consequence of language impairment. The memory impairments observed in aphasic stroke patients were interpreted as working memory impairments with distinct manifestations dependent upon lesion site.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Speeching and Hearing; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kathryn, Bayles A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMemory impairment associated with stroke and aphasia.en_US
dc.creatorBeeson, Pelagie Maritz.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBeeson, Pelagie Maritz.en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractBrain structures in the perisylvian region that are critical for language also subserve verbal memory processes. Researchers have documented a reduction in verbal memory span in individuals with perisylvian stroke resulting in aphasia, but scant data are available regarding the integrity of long-term memory in such individuals. Whereas dissociated memory processes have been documented in nonaphasic populations, characteristic patterns of short- versus long-term memory have not typically been associated with specific lesion sites in aphasic individuals. The purpose of this study was to examine memory abilities of aphasic individuals in relation to site of neurological lesion resulting from cerebrovascular accident. Fourteen individuals with stroke and aphasia and fourteen demographically matched control subjects were given selected tests of short-term memory (STM) and long-term memory (LTM). The stroke patients represented two distinct groups with regard to site of neurological lesion: seven with anterior lesions, seven with posterior lesions. STM was assessed with Digits Forward and Tapping Forward subtests from the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (Wechsler, 1988). Verbal LTM was assessed using two multitrial free recall paradigms. One paradigm required free recall of a word list presented aurally with selective reminding of unrecalled items. The other required free and cued recall of a word list presented with guided semantic encoding. Stroke patients were impaired relative to normal control subjects on tests of verbal memory, with greater impairment of LTM associated with anterior lesions and greater impairment of STM associated with posterior lesions. Individuals with anterior lesions were deficient in the enactment of successful LTM encoding and retrieval strategies. The posterior aphasia group was most impaired for digit span, a task dependent upon subvocal rehearsal. There were no group differences on a test of visual short-term memory. Verbal memory performance did not correlate highly with language ability, and did not appear to be simply a consequence of language impairment. The memory impairments observed in aphasic stroke patients were interpreted as working memory impairments with distinct manifestations dependent upon lesion site.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpeeching and Hearingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKathryn, Bayles A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHixon, Thomas J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBoone, Daniel R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKaszniak, Alfred W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRubens, Alan B.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9103030en_US
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