Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185163
Title:
Rereading and its effects on reading comprehension.
Author:
Tidwell, Deborah Lou
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of rereading as a metacognitive strategy termed focused rereading. The study was conducted over three weeks, involving sixty-six fifth grade subjects from four classrooms in one elementary school. Subjects were randomly assigned to three treatment groups: rereading with training (RRT), rereading without training (RRW), and a control assignment (CA). All subjects were pretested for prior knowledge during the first week, followed by training in the use of written retellings over four days during the second week. Specific treatment training, either in the focused rereading training or in a placebo training, occurred during the first four days of the third week. Post testing occurred on the final day of the third week, involving a test expository passage, a primary comprehension measure using written retelling, followed by a secondary comprehension measure using a multiple choice post test. Results showed no significant differences across treatment groups. High-achievement readers scored significantly better than low achievement readers across treatments. Written retellings appeared to measure different comprehension factors than multiple choice testing, however, both ranked performance in similar ways. Teacher evaluations of achievement were strongly similar to stanine evaluations of achievement.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Language, Reading and Culture; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Mitchell, Judy N.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleRereading and its effects on reading comprehension.en_US
dc.creatorTidwell, Deborah Louen_US
dc.contributor.authorTidwell, Deborah Louen_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of rereading as a metacognitive strategy termed focused rereading. The study was conducted over three weeks, involving sixty-six fifth grade subjects from four classrooms in one elementary school. Subjects were randomly assigned to three treatment groups: rereading with training (RRT), rereading without training (RRW), and a control assignment (CA). All subjects were pretested for prior knowledge during the first week, followed by training in the use of written retellings over four days during the second week. Specific treatment training, either in the focused rereading training or in a placebo training, occurred during the first four days of the third week. Post testing occurred on the final day of the third week, involving a test expository passage, a primary comprehension measure using written retelling, followed by a secondary comprehension measure using a multiple choice post test. Results showed no significant differences across treatment groups. High-achievement readers scored significantly better than low achievement readers across treatments. Written retellings appeared to measure different comprehension factors than multiple choice testing, however, both ranked performance in similar ways. Teacher evaluations of achievement were strongly similar to stanine evaluations of achievement.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading and Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMitchell, Judy N.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBradley, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAmes, Wilbur S.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9103026en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.