Estimation of sensible heat flux from remotely sensed surface temperatures.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185151
Title:
Estimation of sensible heat flux from remotely sensed surface temperatures.
Author:
Cooper, Daniel Ira.
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A series of energy-balance experiments were performed over a winter wheat field in Southern Arizona. A Bowen ratio energy-balance system (BREB), anemometer, and thermal infrared thermometer (IRT) were placed in the center of the field on day 15 of 1988 shortly after germination. The BREB system generated 12-minute averages of net radiation, soil heat flux, latent energy, and sensible heat flux (H) throughout the season, terminating on day 152, just before harvest. On day 134, an eddy-correlation system was placed adjacent to the BREB system, where it collected H-data concurrently for 17 successive days. The data from the BREB and eddy-correlation systems were regressed against each other to quantify their field performance. The regression standard error (SE) between the two systems was ±40 W/m². BREB H-data was used as a "standard" to evaluate three different sensible heat flux models that are suitable for remote sensing applications. The three models require thermal canopy temperature, air temperature, and wind speed as input. Two of the three models use aerodynamic resistance theory, one of which is stability corrected, and the third remote-sensing model employs Monin-Obukhov turbulent transfer theory. The regression analysis between the BREB H-values and the three remote-sensing models shows that the stability corrected aerodynamic resistance model and the Monin-Obukhov model are capable of estimating H-values over a wide range of surface and atmospheric conditions.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Agriculture; Physics
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Renewable Natural Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Gay, Lloyd W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEstimation of sensible heat flux from remotely sensed surface temperatures.en_US
dc.creatorCooper, Daniel Ira.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCooper, Daniel Ira.en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA series of energy-balance experiments were performed over a winter wheat field in Southern Arizona. A Bowen ratio energy-balance system (BREB), anemometer, and thermal infrared thermometer (IRT) were placed in the center of the field on day 15 of 1988 shortly after germination. The BREB system generated 12-minute averages of net radiation, soil heat flux, latent energy, and sensible heat flux (H) throughout the season, terminating on day 152, just before harvest. On day 134, an eddy-correlation system was placed adjacent to the BREB system, where it collected H-data concurrently for 17 successive days. The data from the BREB and eddy-correlation systems were regressed against each other to quantify their field performance. The regression standard error (SE) between the two systems was ±40 W/m². BREB H-data was used as a "standard" to evaluate three different sensible heat flux models that are suitable for remote sensing applications. The three models require thermal canopy temperature, air temperature, and wind speed as input. Two of the three models use aerodynamic resistance theory, one of which is stability corrected, and the third remote-sensing model employs Monin-Obukhov turbulent transfer theory. The regression analysis between the BREB H-values and the three remote-sensing models shows that the stability corrected aerodynamic resistance model and the Monin-Obukhov model are capable of estimating H-values over a wide range of surface and atmospheric conditions.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAgricultureen_US
dc.subjectPhysicsen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGay, Lloyd W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHawkins, Richard H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOsmolski, Zbigniewen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMattias, Allen D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSimpson, James R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9103015en_US
dc.identifier.oclc708661707en_US
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