Characteristics of peers in groups in a middle school: An exploratory study.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185123
Title:
Characteristics of peers in groups in a middle school: An exploratory study.
Author:
Thornburg, Elizabeth Ellen Branson
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this exploratory study was to investigate the characteristics of peers and groups of early adolescents (eleven through fourteen years of age; N = 594) in a middle school environment (grades six, seven, and eight). The study was conducted over one academic school year utilizing three methodologies: observation, interview, and questionnaire. Observer (etic perspective) field notes were analyzed on a daily and ongoing basis to provide data on patterns of grouping and group characteristics. Audiotaped semistructured interviews with the early adolescents (emic perspective) were analyzed by independent raters to provide data on the perceptions of the students regarding characteristics of: self; friends; groups and groupings and the participants at each grade level and across grades; factors of importance for participation in (or exclusion from) specific groups. Analysis was conducted for frequency of response to questionnaire items regarding characteristics. Results of the analyses revealed: (a) differences and consistencies of etic and emic perspectives regarding characteristics of groupings and the participants; (b) similarities and dissimilarities of groups (dyads, cliques, crowds, gangs described in other research); (c) group participation appeared to be related to by gender, grade level, personal physical size, maturational development, activities, personal security, common interests, levels of conformity to adult expectations, and social adeptness. The questionnaire results indicated slight differences for important characteristics for the self and for friends to possess. Limitations of the present research, and implications and suggestions for further research are discussed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education; Psychology
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Foundations and Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Mishra, Shitala P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCharacteristics of peers in groups in a middle school: An exploratory study.en_US
dc.creatorThornburg, Elizabeth Ellen Bransonen_US
dc.contributor.authorThornburg, Elizabeth Ellen Bransonen_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this exploratory study was to investigate the characteristics of peers and groups of early adolescents (eleven through fourteen years of age; N = 594) in a middle school environment (grades six, seven, and eight). The study was conducted over one academic school year utilizing three methodologies: observation, interview, and questionnaire. Observer (etic perspective) field notes were analyzed on a daily and ongoing basis to provide data on patterns of grouping and group characteristics. Audiotaped semistructured interviews with the early adolescents (emic perspective) were analyzed by independent raters to provide data on the perceptions of the students regarding characteristics of: self; friends; groups and groupings and the participants at each grade level and across grades; factors of importance for participation in (or exclusion from) specific groups. Analysis was conducted for frequency of response to questionnaire items regarding characteristics. Results of the analyses revealed: (a) differences and consistencies of etic and emic perspectives regarding characteristics of groupings and the participants; (b) similarities and dissimilarities of groups (dyads, cliques, crowds, gangs described in other research); (c) group participation appeared to be related to by gender, grade level, personal physical size, maturational development, activities, personal security, common interests, levels of conformity to adult expectations, and social adeptness. The questionnaire results indicated slight differences for important characteristics for the self and for friends to possess. Limitations of the present research, and implications and suggestions for further research are discussed.en_US
dc.description.noteDigitization note: p. 171 missing from paper original and microfilm version; appears to be pagination error.en
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducationen_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Foundations and Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMishra, Shitala P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAleamoni, Lawrence M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNewlon, Betty J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9100052en_US
dc.identifier.oclc708396734en_US
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