Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185119
Title:
'Ecriture feminine' as autobiography in Walter Pater.
Author:
Rajan, Gita.
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This is the first study that examines the concept of autobiography in Walter Pater's works using ecriture feminine. Ecriture feminine serves as a critical model that interrogates the semiotics behind Pater's strategy in the composition of his oeuvre. The study goes beyond the scope of traditional scholarship by reading Pater's texts not oniy as thematic expressions of his artistic ability, but also by uncovering his hidden political agenda by examining the language of the texts against the grain of his cultural milieu. By positing a speaking subject at the intersection of language and text, this study reveals how Pater uses intertextuality to portray his marginalization from the intellectual and cultural community of his time. This study focuses mainly upon "Diaphaneite," Gaston de Latour, Imaginary Portraits, and his letters. The validity of the study clearly lies in its systematic inquiry of the concept of a gendered speaking subject in Pater's texts, particularly one that is structured both rhetorically and semiotically through the typical Victorian metaphor of crisis yet enunciates a radical response to Victorian ideology.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Literature
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
English; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Monsman, Gerald

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.title'Ecriture feminine' as autobiography in Walter Pater.en_US
dc.creatorRajan, Gita.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRajan, Gita.en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis is the first study that examines the concept of autobiography in Walter Pater's works using ecriture feminine. Ecriture feminine serves as a critical model that interrogates the semiotics behind Pater's strategy in the composition of his oeuvre. The study goes beyond the scope of traditional scholarship by reading Pater's texts not oniy as thematic expressions of his artistic ability, but also by uncovering his hidden political agenda by examining the language of the texts against the grain of his cultural milieu. By positing a speaking subject at the intersection of language and text, this study reveals how Pater uses intertextuality to portray his marginalization from the intellectual and cultural community of his time. This study focuses mainly upon "Diaphaneite," Gaston de Latour, Imaginary Portraits, and his letters. The validity of the study clearly lies in its systematic inquiry of the concept of a gendered speaking subject in Pater's texts, particularly one that is structured both rhetorically and semiotically through the typical Victorian metaphor of crisis yet enunciates a radical response to Victorian ideology.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectLiteratureen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMonsman, Geralden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDavis, Robert Conen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRaval, Sureshen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBabcock, Barbaraen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9100048en_US
dc.identifier.oclc710856219en_US
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