Partners involved in abusive relationships and help-seeking: A field study of service provider responses in the referral process.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185112
Title:
Partners involved in abusive relationships and help-seeking: A field study of service provider responses in the referral process.
Author:
Harvey, David Raymond.
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study investigated the interaction of partners involved in abusive relationships and community agency sources for referral to treatment alternatives. Forty-eight service providers in six agency settings participated in the field study. Participants' contacts with male and female partners involved in abusive relationships were documented for sixteen weeks. The types of services to which these partners were referred were also documented. A multiple group time series design investigated the relationship of two referral skills training formats and the frequency of participants' referral contacts. The study recorded the attitudes and beliefs of service providers regarding training needs, treatment efficacy, and facilitative referral behavior with abused and abusive partners. The study's findings indicated that it is feasible to implement a data collection system to measure demand for domestic violence services within a community service delivery system. Among the findings across the six settings, 83 percent of the total referral contacts and 95 percent of the in-person contacts were made with female partners. Other results indicated that 64 percent of referrals of male partners were to private practice settings, compared with 19 percent of couple referrals, and 4 percent of female partner referrals. No relationship was found between referral skills training formats and the frequency of participants' referral contacts. The constraints of the field study context appeared to limit the investigation of this relationship. Participants did indicate preferences for additional training in very practical referral skill areas. Other participant beliefs and attitudes regarding the efficacy of services and facilitative referral behaviors with abused and abusive partners are presented. The limitations of the study and the implications of the findings are discussed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education; Psychology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Family and Consumer Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Lauver, Phillip

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePartners involved in abusive relationships and help-seeking: A field study of service provider responses in the referral process.en_US
dc.creatorHarvey, David Raymond.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHarvey, David Raymond.en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the interaction of partners involved in abusive relationships and community agency sources for referral to treatment alternatives. Forty-eight service providers in six agency settings participated in the field study. Participants' contacts with male and female partners involved in abusive relationships were documented for sixteen weeks. The types of services to which these partners were referred were also documented. A multiple group time series design investigated the relationship of two referral skills training formats and the frequency of participants' referral contacts. The study recorded the attitudes and beliefs of service providers regarding training needs, treatment efficacy, and facilitative referral behavior with abused and abusive partners. The study's findings indicated that it is feasible to implement a data collection system to measure demand for domestic violence services within a community service delivery system. Among the findings across the six settings, 83 percent of the total referral contacts and 95 percent of the in-person contacts were made with female partners. Other results indicated that 64 percent of referrals of male partners were to private practice settings, compared with 19 percent of couple referrals, and 4 percent of female partner referrals. No relationship was found between referral skills training formats and the frequency of participants' referral contacts. The constraints of the field study context appeared to limit the investigation of this relationship. Participants did indicate preferences for additional training in very practical referral skill areas. Other participant beliefs and attitudes regarding the efficacy of services and facilitative referral behaviors with abused and abusive partners are presented. The limitations of the study and the implications of the findings are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducationen_US
dc.subjectPsychology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily and Consumer Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLauver, Phillipen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberErickson, Richarden_US
dc.identifier.proquest9100042en_US
dc.identifier.oclc708399390en_US
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