Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185110
Title:
Beam propagation and shift-variant optics.
Author:
Eckhardt, Stephen Karl.
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The goal of the research described in this dissertation is to be able to model propagation of light through shift-variant optics. Shift-variant optical elements have a point spread function which is a function of the transverse coordinates. This shift-variance can be caused by aberration or by the first order properties of the optical system. In this work the latter is emphasized. Specifically, this dissertation discusses propagation through lenses and prisms and between tilted planes or a plane and a spherical surface. Extension to other types of shift-variant optical elements is possible. Two methods for performing the propagation are described. One, the beam division model, divides the beam into isoplanatic patches, separately propagates the patches and recombines them on the observation surface. The second method, the mapping model, maps the beam into a space in which the propagation is shift-invariant, propagates and then maps back into real space. Experimental verification of these methods is demonstrated by means of the Talbot effect. The setup consists of a collimated laser beam passing through a Ronchi ruling of about ten cycles per millimeter. With no intervening optics, Talbot images of the ruling are formed which are parallel to the wavefronts. When a prism at minimum deviation is placed in the outgoing beam, it causes the Talbot images to be tilted with respect to the wavefronts. If a stigmatic unit magnification telescope replaces the prism, the Talbot images are formed on surfaces congruent to the Petzval surface.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Physics
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Optical Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Burke, Jim

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleBeam propagation and shift-variant optics.en_US
dc.creatorEckhardt, Stephen Karl.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEckhardt, Stephen Karl.en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe goal of the research described in this dissertation is to be able to model propagation of light through shift-variant optics. Shift-variant optical elements have a point spread function which is a function of the transverse coordinates. This shift-variance can be caused by aberration or by the first order properties of the optical system. In this work the latter is emphasized. Specifically, this dissertation discusses propagation through lenses and prisms and between tilted planes or a plane and a spherical surface. Extension to other types of shift-variant optical elements is possible. Two methods for performing the propagation are described. One, the beam division model, divides the beam into isoplanatic patches, separately propagates the patches and recombines them on the observation surface. The second method, the mapping model, maps the beam into a space in which the propagation is shift-invariant, propagates and then maps back into real space. Experimental verification of these methods is demonstrated by means of the Talbot effect. The setup consists of a collimated laser beam passing through a Ronchi ruling of about ten cycles per millimeter. With no intervening optics, Talbot images of the ruling are formed which are parallel to the wavefronts. When a prism at minimum deviation is placed in the outgoing beam, it causes the Talbot images to be tilted with respect to the wavefronts. If a stigmatic unit magnification telescope replaces the prism, the Talbot images are formed on surfaces congruent to the Petzval surface.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPhysicsen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBurke, Jimen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLawrence, Georgeen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9100039en_US
dc.identifier.oclc708399302en_US
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