Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185103
Title:
Marital reciprocal support in the context of cancer.
Author:
Douglass, Lillian Gearldian.
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between mutual spouse support and the psychological status of spouses whose mates were being treated for cancer. The conceptual framework was developed from a literature review in which empirical studies and interpersonal theories suggested the importance of social support to health promotion and maintenance in stressful life situations. A descriptive cross-sectional correlational design was used. A convenience sample consisted of 146 individuals (73 couples) one of whom was being treated for cancer. Subjects completed adapted versions of Tilden's Interpersonal Relationships Inventory and Braden's Disease Course Graphic Scale, Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale, and the Center for Epidemiological Studies - Depression Scale. Study findings indicate that: (1) Well spouses perceived less support in the marital relationship than did spouses with cancer. (2) Well spouses' depression was lower and self-esteem higher when both spouses perceived high levels of interpersonal support. (3) When both spouses perceived low levels of interpersonal support depression was higher and self-esteem lower in the well spouse. (4) When one spouse perceived high and the other low levels of interpersonal support depression was higher and self-esteem lower in the well spouse. (5) Well spouses' self-esteem was higher when both spouses perceived high levels of marital reciprocal support. (6) When both spouses perceived low levels of marital reciprocal support self-esteem was lower in the well spouse. (7) When one spouse perceived high and the other low levels of marital reciprocal support self-esteem was lower in the well spouse. (8) The greater the absolute difference in dyadic perception of interpersonal support the greater the well spouses' depression. (9) The more well spouses perceived marital reciprocal support the higher was their self-esteem and lower their depression. Research is needed that identifies whether health outcomes are better when spouses support each other than when the well spouse supports the patient without perceiving support in return. Results of this study provide a beginning point from which to pursue theory development, testing, and intervention studies to assist both spouses with optimal management of the cancer experience.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Sociology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Nursing; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Longman, Alice J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMarital reciprocal support in the context of cancer.en_US
dc.creatorDouglass, Lillian Gearldian.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDouglass, Lillian Gearldian.en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between mutual spouse support and the psychological status of spouses whose mates were being treated for cancer. The conceptual framework was developed from a literature review in which empirical studies and interpersonal theories suggested the importance of social support to health promotion and maintenance in stressful life situations. A descriptive cross-sectional correlational design was used. A convenience sample consisted of 146 individuals (73 couples) one of whom was being treated for cancer. Subjects completed adapted versions of Tilden's Interpersonal Relationships Inventory and Braden's Disease Course Graphic Scale, Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale, and the Center for Epidemiological Studies - Depression Scale. Study findings indicate that: (1) Well spouses perceived less support in the marital relationship than did spouses with cancer. (2) Well spouses' depression was lower and self-esteem higher when both spouses perceived high levels of interpersonal support. (3) When both spouses perceived low levels of interpersonal support depression was higher and self-esteem lower in the well spouse. (4) When one spouse perceived high and the other low levels of interpersonal support depression was higher and self-esteem lower in the well spouse. (5) Well spouses' self-esteem was higher when both spouses perceived high levels of marital reciprocal support. (6) When both spouses perceived low levels of marital reciprocal support self-esteem was lower in the well spouse. (7) When one spouse perceived high and the other low levels of marital reciprocal support self-esteem was lower in the well spouse. (8) The greater the absolute difference in dyadic perception of interpersonal support the greater the well spouses' depression. (9) The more well spouses perceived marital reciprocal support the higher was their self-esteem and lower their depression. Research is needed that identifies whether health outcomes are better when spouses support each other than when the well spouse supports the patient without perceiving support in return. Results of this study provide a beginning point from which to pursue theory development, testing, and intervention studies to assist both spouses with optimal management of the cancer experience.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSociology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLongman, Alice J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVan Ort, Suzanneen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGeber, Rose M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBootzin, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSechrest, Leeen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9032527en_US
dc.identifier.oclc708624883en_US
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