Technical, value, and institutional aspects of integrated use conflicts: A timber and water management case study.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185099
Title:
Technical, value, and institutional aspects of integrated use conflicts: A timber and water management case study.
Author:
Abubakar, Mohammad Mahmood.
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This research examined the technical, social, and institutional aspects of integrated (multiple-use) watershed management conflicts, with a focus on timber and water management. The problem was first examined from a general perspective. Then, a specific case study was analyzed. The Bull Run watershed near Portland, Oregon, was chosen for the case study, because it provides a well-known and long-standing example of conflict over timber harvesting and water quality protection. Analyses were conducted on the relationship of logging and water quality, economics of information, conflicts and institutional sources of conflicts in integrated watershed management, available information and value of additional information. Forested watersheds commonly are managed for multiple purposes, one of which is the production of high quality potable water. Conflicts often arise when another of those purposes is timber production, because logging is perceived as a threat to water quality. These conflicts can result from uncertain factual information, from differences underlying social values, or from perceived imbalances in the incident of costs and benefits. Resulting conflicts may go unresolved because existing institutional structures are incapable of resolving disputes. When such conflicts go unresolved, benefits are often lost, and social, political, and managerial costs are high. This study found that the roots of conflict often lie in value differences or in interest impacts, but attention is focused inappropriately and unproductively on factual issues. This research should point the way to resolution of long-standing disputes in the management of forested watersheds by identifying the root causes of these disputes and choosing those actions, whether they be change management guidelines, additional information collection, or altered institutional structure, which may be effective in resolving them.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Agriculture
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Renewable Natural Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Lord, William B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTechnical, value, and institutional aspects of integrated use conflicts: A timber and water management case study.en_US
dc.creatorAbubakar, Mohammad Mahmood.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAbubakar, Mohammad Mahmood.en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis research examined the technical, social, and institutional aspects of integrated (multiple-use) watershed management conflicts, with a focus on timber and water management. The problem was first examined from a general perspective. Then, a specific case study was analyzed. The Bull Run watershed near Portland, Oregon, was chosen for the case study, because it provides a well-known and long-standing example of conflict over timber harvesting and water quality protection. Analyses were conducted on the relationship of logging and water quality, economics of information, conflicts and institutional sources of conflicts in integrated watershed management, available information and value of additional information. Forested watersheds commonly are managed for multiple purposes, one of which is the production of high quality potable water. Conflicts often arise when another of those purposes is timber production, because logging is perceived as a threat to water quality. These conflicts can result from uncertain factual information, from differences underlying social values, or from perceived imbalances in the incident of costs and benefits. Resulting conflicts may go unresolved because existing institutional structures are incapable of resolving disputes. When such conflicts go unresolved, benefits are often lost, and social, political, and managerial costs are high. This study found that the roots of conflict often lie in value differences or in interest impacts, but attention is focused inappropriately and unproductively on factual issues. This research should point the way to resolution of long-standing disputes in the management of forested watersheds by identifying the root causes of these disputes and choosing those actions, whether they be change management guidelines, additional information collection, or altered institutional structure, which may be effective in resolving them.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAgricultureen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLord, William B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFogel, Martin M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHawkins, Richard H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMann, Lawrence D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGibson, Lay J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFfolliott, Peter F.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9032523en_US
dc.identifier.oclc708389396en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.