Seismic design recommendations for high-strength concrete beam-to-column connections.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185042
Title:
Seismic design recommendations for high-strength concrete beam-to-column connections.
Author:
Alameddine, Fadel F.
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The present recommendations of the ACI-ASCE Committee 352 for the design of ductile moment resistant beam to column connections limit the joint shear stress to γ√f'(c), where the factor γ is a function of the joint geometric classification and the loading condition. The value of compressive strength f'(c) used in the above expression should not exceed 6000 psi. This limitation causes considerable difficulty in the design of high-strength concrete frames. An experimental study of twelve large-scale exterior beam to column subassemblies was completed at The University of Arizona. The specimens were subjected to cyclic inelastic loading. The variables studied were the concrete compressive strength (8.1, 10.7, and 13.6 ksi), the joint shear stress (1100 and 1400 psi), and the degree of joint confinement provided in the form of closed ties. Although high-strength concrete is more brittle than normal-strength concrete, the study showed that frames constructed of high-strength concrete can perform satisfactorily in earthquakes zones when attention is given to proper detailing of joints. The flexural strength ratio, degree of joint confinement, development length of bars, and joint shear stress are all very important factors to be considered in the design process. The maximum permissible joint shear stress suggested by ACI-ASCE Committee 352 was modified for frames constructed with high-strength concrete. The proposed joint shear stress drawn from test results does not affect the factor γ which depends on the joint type and its geometric classification. Therefore, in the absence of any further data about interior joints, the proposed joint shear limit for high-strength concrete can be used for all types and geometric classifications of joints. Furthermore, new requirements for joint confinement were presented to ensure ductile behavior of frames. It is important to note that current Recommendations for joint confinement, which were developed for normal-strength concrete, cannot be satisfied for high-strength concrete frames. The hysteresis response of specimens tested and other normal-strength concrete specimens tested by different investigators were compared in terms of their energy absorption capacity. This comparison was essential to alleviate concern about the lack of ductility of high-strength concrete. Favorable results were obtained. This research is important for practitioners to gain more confidence using high-strength concrete for structural design applications especially in seismic zones.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
High strength concrete; Concrete beams.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ehsani, M.R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSeismic design recommendations for high-strength concrete beam-to-column connections.en_US
dc.creatorAlameddine, Fadel F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAlameddine, Fadel F.en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe present recommendations of the ACI-ASCE Committee 352 for the design of ductile moment resistant beam to column connections limit the joint shear stress to γ√f'(c), where the factor γ is a function of the joint geometric classification and the loading condition. The value of compressive strength f'(c) used in the above expression should not exceed 6000 psi. This limitation causes considerable difficulty in the design of high-strength concrete frames. An experimental study of twelve large-scale exterior beam to column subassemblies was completed at The University of Arizona. The specimens were subjected to cyclic inelastic loading. The variables studied were the concrete compressive strength (8.1, 10.7, and 13.6 ksi), the joint shear stress (1100 and 1400 psi), and the degree of joint confinement provided in the form of closed ties. Although high-strength concrete is more brittle than normal-strength concrete, the study showed that frames constructed of high-strength concrete can perform satisfactorily in earthquakes zones when attention is given to proper detailing of joints. The flexural strength ratio, degree of joint confinement, development length of bars, and joint shear stress are all very important factors to be considered in the design process. The maximum permissible joint shear stress suggested by ACI-ASCE Committee 352 was modified for frames constructed with high-strength concrete. The proposed joint shear stress drawn from test results does not affect the factor γ which depends on the joint type and its geometric classification. Therefore, in the absence of any further data about interior joints, the proposed joint shear limit for high-strength concrete can be used for all types and geometric classifications of joints. Furthermore, new requirements for joint confinement were presented to ensure ductile behavior of frames. It is important to note that current Recommendations for joint confinement, which were developed for normal-strength concrete, cannot be satisfied for high-strength concrete frames. The hysteresis response of specimens tested and other normal-strength concrete specimens tested by different investigators were compared in terms of their energy absorption capacity. This comparison was essential to alleviate concern about the lack of ductility of high-strength concrete. Favorable results were obtained. This research is important for practitioners to gain more confidence using high-strength concrete for structural design applications especially in seismic zones.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHigh strength concreteen_US
dc.subjectConcrete beams.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil Engineering and Engineering Mechanicsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorEhsani, M.R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDaDeppo, D.A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKiousis, P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSaadatmanesh, H.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9025062en_US
dc.identifier.oclc704380404en_US
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