Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/185006
Title:
Some spatial characteristics of behavior: A new technology.
Author:
Robles-Sotelo, Elias.
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A methodology consisting of an experimental chamber, operational definitions of behavior categories, and methods for quantitative analysis of the use of space by small rodents is presented. The chamber consists of a large open box in which the location of the animal was determined by a grid of 24 x 24 infrared beams. Recording was achieved by sampling every 5 seconds, and storing the status of the 48 photosensors in a disk file for later analysis. Each sample produced a binary matrix with 576 cells identifying the location of the animal at that time. From this sequence of matrices a number of behaviors were defined and described. Exploration was measured as the cumulative percentage of unique cells visited by the subject during the observation period. Monotonically decelerating curves were found, with exploration during the first day in the chamber significantly different from that on the following three days, according to the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Time allocation was measured as the relative frequency of visits to individual cells computed for various time intervals. Three dimensional charts with spatial location along the X and Y axis, and relative frequency in the Z axis were used to represent time allocation to space or "spatial preference". These surfaces were transformed into vectors and compared with the same goodness-of-fit test. The operational definition of time allocation as well as the methods for comparing the surfaces were found adequate to reliably describe nesting and patrolling patterns of Ratus Norvegicus. Finally, activity was defined as the amount of space visited as a function of time. This measure of rat of location change was computed in 15 min. intervals for 15 consecutive nights. A consistent 3-hour cycle of activity was detected using ARIMA methods. The cycle was accurately described and predicted with a model containing one periodic and one nonperiodic components. The usefulness of this nonintrusive technology for digitizing behavior in space is discussed in terms of possible applications to studies on learning, behavioral pharmacology, and ethology.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bechtel, Robert

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSome spatial characteristics of behavior: A new technology.en_US
dc.creatorRobles-Sotelo, Elias.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRobles-Sotelo, Elias.en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA methodology consisting of an experimental chamber, operational definitions of behavior categories, and methods for quantitative analysis of the use of space by small rodents is presented. The chamber consists of a large open box in which the location of the animal was determined by a grid of 24 x 24 infrared beams. Recording was achieved by sampling every 5 seconds, and storing the status of the 48 photosensors in a disk file for later analysis. Each sample produced a binary matrix with 576 cells identifying the location of the animal at that time. From this sequence of matrices a number of behaviors were defined and described. Exploration was measured as the cumulative percentage of unique cells visited by the subject during the observation period. Monotonically decelerating curves were found, with exploration during the first day in the chamber significantly different from that on the following three days, according to the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Time allocation was measured as the relative frequency of visits to individual cells computed for various time intervals. Three dimensional charts with spatial location along the X and Y axis, and relative frequency in the Z axis were used to represent time allocation to space or "spatial preference". These surfaces were transformed into vectors and compared with the same goodness-of-fit test. The operational definition of time allocation as well as the methods for comparing the surfaces were found adequate to reliably describe nesting and patrolling patterns of Ratus Norvegicus. Finally, activity was defined as the amount of space visited as a function of time. This measure of rat of location change was computed in 15 min. intervals for 15 consecutive nights. A consistent 3-hour cycle of activity was detected using ARIMA methods. The cycle was accurately described and predicted with a model containing one periodic and one nonperiodic components. The usefulness of this nonintrusive technology for digitizing behavior in space is discussed in terms of possible applications to studies on learning, behavioral pharmacology, and ethology.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBechtel, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberIttelson, Wiliam H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDaniel, Terry C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKing, James E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBijou, Sidney W.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9024516en_US
dc.identifier.oclc708123983en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.