Influence of sodium chloride on tepary (Phaseolus acutifolius Gray) and navy (Phaseolus vulgaris L) beans.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184985
Title:
Influence of sodium chloride on tepary (Phaseolus acutifolius Gray) and navy (Phaseolus vulgaris L) beans.
Author:
Alislail, Nabeel Yonnis
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Shoot and root fresh and dry weight, shoot length, leaf area, leaf area index and relative growth rate of 14 day old tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolis Gray) and navy bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seedlings were reduced following treatment with NaCl solution exhibiting osmotic potential of either -0.25, 0.50, and -0.75 MPa. Salinity reduced the growth of navy bean more than tepary bean. The physiological basis of the adaptive response of tepary bean seedlings to salt stress was explored by determining the water and osmotic potentials, relative water content, free amino acid and sugar concentrations, distribution and levels of inorganic ions within the seedlings and ATPase activity of the root plasma membrane. Salinity led to an osmotic adjustment in the leaves and the proximal part of the root of tepary bean. Turgor remained almost constant whereas osmotic and water potential and relative water content declined following the salt treatments. The osmotic adjustment of the leaves and proximal part of the roots was -1.7 MPa and -1.2 MPa, respectively, in seedlings treated with -0.75 MPa NaCl solution. Free amino acids and sugars increased under salinity stress in both species but they increased more in the tepary bean. Glucose was the most abundant free sugar. The nonstructural carbon solutes contributed -0.15 MPa to the seedling's osmotic adjustment whereas Na, Cl, K and Ca ion levels contributed -0.85 MPa. However, the levels of these solutes were not large enough to account for the total osmotic adjustment observed in the salt treated seedlings. This study shows that tepary bean has specific strategies to overcome the impact of salinity through osmotic adjustment and exclusion of Na and Cl ions from the stems and leaves by retaining these ions in the proximal part of root and stem base. (Abstract shortened with permission of author.)
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Beans -- Growth; Kidney bean -- Growth; Plants -- Effect of salt on; Salt-tolerant crops.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Plant Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bartels, Paul G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleInfluence of sodium chloride on tepary (Phaseolus acutifolius Gray) and navy (Phaseolus vulgaris L) beans.en_US
dc.creatorAlislail, Nabeel Yonnisen_US
dc.contributor.authorAlislail, Nabeel Yonnisen_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractShoot and root fresh and dry weight, shoot length, leaf area, leaf area index and relative growth rate of 14 day old tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolis Gray) and navy bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seedlings were reduced following treatment with NaCl solution exhibiting osmotic potential of either -0.25, 0.50, and -0.75 MPa. Salinity reduced the growth of navy bean more than tepary bean. The physiological basis of the adaptive response of tepary bean seedlings to salt stress was explored by determining the water and osmotic potentials, relative water content, free amino acid and sugar concentrations, distribution and levels of inorganic ions within the seedlings and ATPase activity of the root plasma membrane. Salinity led to an osmotic adjustment in the leaves and the proximal part of the root of tepary bean. Turgor remained almost constant whereas osmotic and water potential and relative water content declined following the salt treatments. The osmotic adjustment of the leaves and proximal part of the roots was -1.7 MPa and -1.2 MPa, respectively, in seedlings treated with -0.75 MPa NaCl solution. Free amino acids and sugars increased under salinity stress in both species but they increased more in the tepary bean. Glucose was the most abundant free sugar. The nonstructural carbon solutes contributed -0.15 MPa to the seedling's osmotic adjustment whereas Na, Cl, K and Ca ion levels contributed -0.85 MPa. However, the levels of these solutes were not large enough to account for the total osmotic adjustment observed in the salt treated seedlings. This study shows that tepary bean has specific strategies to overcome the impact of salinity through osmotic adjustment and exclusion of Na and Cl ions from the stems and leaves by retaining these ions in the proximal part of root and stem base. (Abstract shortened with permission of author.)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBeans -- Growthen_US
dc.subjectKidney bean -- Growthen_US
dc.subjectPlants -- Effect of salt onen_US
dc.subjectSalt-tolerant crops.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePlant Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBartels, Paul G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMatsuda, Kaoruen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBriggs, Robert E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKatterman, Franken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHamilton, Keithen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9024497en_US
dc.identifier.oclc704594510en_US
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