Local and regional patterns of distribution and abundance in marine reef fishes.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184983
Title:
Local and regional patterns of distribution and abundance in marine reef fishes.
Author:
Zapata, Fernando Alberto.
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Local and regional patterns of distribution and abundance are documented in marine rocky-reef fishes. Chapter one describes limits of distribution and patterns of density variation of two fishes in a northern Gulf of California intertidal shore. The density of Sonora gobies (Gobiosoma chiquita) increases with tidal height over its intertidal range (-1.2 to 0.9 m), whereas the density of patchscale gobies (Gobiosoma sp.) decreases from the subtidal zone to 0.6 m above mean low water level. Both species exhibit higher densities during the warmer season when intertidal temperature gradients are weaker than during the colder season. Sonora gobies show a broader range of temperature tolerance than patchscale gobies but there is no evidence of shifts in distribution between seasons suggesting that the distributions of these species are not determined by temperature. Interspecific interactions may contribute to the patterns of intertidal distribution and abundance in these species despite the rigorous physical environment of the area. Chapter two documents a positive correlation between average local abundance and extent of geographic distribution in rocky-shore fishes from the Gulf of California. This correlation is not an artifact of sampling an arbitrarily defined region and is unlikely to be an artifact of sampling bias. The occurrence of this relationship in a variety of organisms suggests that the processes responsible for this pattern are likely to be similar in both terrestrial and marine environments despite fundamental differences between the two. Chapter three demonstrates that egg type and adult body size explain a considerable portion of the variation in extent of geographic range in marine reef fishes. Species with pelagic eggs have larger geographic ranges, longer larval lives, and larger body sizes than species with non-pelagic eggs. Small species with non-pelagic eggs show smaller geographic ranges than any other combination of body size and egg type. These biogeographic patterns predict a greater degree of genetic isolation among populations, and a greater species turnover over evolutionary time in clades of small species with non-pelagic eggs than in clades of species with other combinations of body size and egg type.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Marine fishes -- Ecology -- Mexico -- California, Gulf of; Intertidal ecology -- Mexico -- California, Gulf of; Gobiidae -- Ecology
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Thomas, Donald A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleLocal and regional patterns of distribution and abundance in marine reef fishes.en_US
dc.creatorZapata, Fernando Alberto.en_US
dc.contributor.authorZapata, Fernando Alberto.en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractLocal and regional patterns of distribution and abundance are documented in marine rocky-reef fishes. Chapter one describes limits of distribution and patterns of density variation of two fishes in a northern Gulf of California intertidal shore. The density of Sonora gobies (Gobiosoma chiquita) increases with tidal height over its intertidal range (-1.2 to 0.9 m), whereas the density of patchscale gobies (Gobiosoma sp.) decreases from the subtidal zone to 0.6 m above mean low water level. Both species exhibit higher densities during the warmer season when intertidal temperature gradients are weaker than during the colder season. Sonora gobies show a broader range of temperature tolerance than patchscale gobies but there is no evidence of shifts in distribution between seasons suggesting that the distributions of these species are not determined by temperature. Interspecific interactions may contribute to the patterns of intertidal distribution and abundance in these species despite the rigorous physical environment of the area. Chapter two documents a positive correlation between average local abundance and extent of geographic distribution in rocky-shore fishes from the Gulf of California. This correlation is not an artifact of sampling an arbitrarily defined region and is unlikely to be an artifact of sampling bias. The occurrence of this relationship in a variety of organisms suggests that the processes responsible for this pattern are likely to be similar in both terrestrial and marine environments despite fundamental differences between the two. Chapter three demonstrates that egg type and adult body size explain a considerable portion of the variation in extent of geographic range in marine reef fishes. Species with pelagic eggs have larger geographic ranges, longer larval lives, and larger body sizes than species with non-pelagic eggs. Small species with non-pelagic eggs show smaller geographic ranges than any other combination of body size and egg type. These biogeographic patterns predict a greater degree of genetic isolation among populations, and a greater species turnover over evolutionary time in clades of small species with non-pelagic eggs than in clades of species with other combinations of body size and egg type.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectMarine fishes -- Ecology -- Mexico -- California, Gulf ofen_US
dc.subjectIntertidal ecology -- Mexico -- California, Gulf ofen_US
dc.subjectGobiidae -- Ecologyen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEcology and Evolutionary Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorThomas, Donald A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStrauss, Richard S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVleck, David J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBrown, James H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBronstein, Judith A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9022119en_US
dc.identifier.oclc703672872en_US
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