ACQUISITION OF CLINICAL INTERVIEWING SKILLS OF STUDENTS PREPARING FOR THE MEDICAL PROFESSION.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184982
Title:
ACQUISITION OF CLINICAL INTERVIEWING SKILLS OF STUDENTS PREPARING FOR THE MEDICAL PROFESSION.
Author:
BURPEAU-DI GREGORIO, MICHELE YOUNG.
Issue Date:
1982
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The ability to gather accurate and complete information is important in scientific endeavors and the field of medicine is no exception. The medical interview is one of the primary methods by which the physician gathers information. His/her method should be no less than that used by the scientist. There are two components to the medical interview: The content, or the specific information, and the process, or the method by which the information is obtained. Traditional methods for teaching interviewing skills to medical students emphasized an on-the-job type of experience with students going out on the wards to interview actual patients. The method had several problems including lack of standardized methods of teaching and evaluating. This dissertation looks at a competency-based method of teaching and evaluating medical interview skills used at The University of Arizona College of Medicine. It uses patient instructors (PIs) to objectively evaluate interviewing skills. PIs are highly trained non-physicians who have been trained to function as patients, teachers, and evaluators. Analysis of the data collected on student interview performance from the classes of 1982-1984 indicated that there was no significant difference in content or process scores due to sex or prior occupational experience in a health-related profession. However, significant differences were found in content and process scores due to the age of the interviewer with students older than the class average scoring higher than the younger students.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Medical history taking.; Physician and patient.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Thornburg, Hershel D.
Committee Chair:
Thornburg, Hershel D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleACQUISITION OF CLINICAL INTERVIEWING SKILLS OF STUDENTS PREPARING FOR THE MEDICAL PROFESSION.en_US
dc.creatorBURPEAU-DI GREGORIO, MICHELE YOUNG.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBURPEAU-DI GREGORIO, MICHELE YOUNG.en_US
dc.date.issued1982en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe ability to gather accurate and complete information is important in scientific endeavors and the field of medicine is no exception. The medical interview is one of the primary methods by which the physician gathers information. His/her method should be no less than that used by the scientist. There are two components to the medical interview: The content, or the specific information, and the process, or the method by which the information is obtained. Traditional methods for teaching interviewing skills to medical students emphasized an on-the-job type of experience with students going out on the wards to interview actual patients. The method had several problems including lack of standardized methods of teaching and evaluating. This dissertation looks at a competency-based method of teaching and evaluating medical interview skills used at The University of Arizona College of Medicine. It uses patient instructors (PIs) to objectively evaluate interviewing skills. PIs are highly trained non-physicians who have been trained to function as patients, teachers, and evaluators. Analysis of the data collected on student interview performance from the classes of 1982-1984 indicated that there was no significant difference in content or process scores due to sex or prior occupational experience in a health-related profession. However, significant differences were found in content and process scores due to the age of the interviewer with students older than the class average scoring higher than the younger students.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectMedical history taking.en_US
dc.subjectPhysician and patient.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorThornburg, Hershel D.en_US
dc.contributor.chairThornburg, Hershel D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMishra, Shitala P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKratochwill, Thomas R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8304716en_US
dc.identifier.oclc683259137en_US
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