Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184979
Title:
Professional school psychology in Sweden: An empirical study.
Author:
Morris, Yvonne Paula.
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study explored the training and professional practice of school psychologists in Sweden. A survey of Swedish school psychologists was conducted with data gathered by means of a questionnaire, the Swedish School Psychology Questionnaire (SSPQ). Data analyses focused on the demographic characteristics, training, and professional practices of Swedish school psychologists. An analysis of the differences between training and professional practice, and a discussion of professionalization and professional attitudes of Swedish school psychologists, were also included. Survey findings indicated that there was no special training for school psychologists, and that the majority of school psychologists had the equivalent of a master's level degree in psychology. Rankings of the importance of various role functions during training and professional practice were also compiled. With few exceptions, t test analyses indicated significant differences in the relative importance of these role functions during training and practice. An analysis of the correlations between school psychologists' rankings of the more global role functions of assessment, treatment, consultation, organizational development, and research during their respective training, professional practice, ideal job, and perceived level of competence, reveal weak relationships between these four conditions, with the lowest correlation being between training and current job. Attitudes of professional autonomy, as well as findings on training, practice, and professional memberships and journal subscriptions suggest that Swedish school psychologists meet the criteria of a professional. Analysis of one year and five year career plans indicated that although most school respondents see themselves working as a school psychologist in the short term, only 45% anticipated working as a school psychologist in five years, with the majority of those leaving the field indicating that they intend to seek employment as a psychologist in a non-school setting. The results were discussed in relation to studies of school psychologists in other countries, particularly the United States. Limitations of the present study were discussed, as were topics for future research.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Foundations and Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Mishra, Shitala P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleProfessional school psychology in Sweden: An empirical study.en_US
dc.creatorMorris, Yvonne Paula.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMorris, Yvonne Paula.en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study explored the training and professional practice of school psychologists in Sweden. A survey of Swedish school psychologists was conducted with data gathered by means of a questionnaire, the Swedish School Psychology Questionnaire (SSPQ). Data analyses focused on the demographic characteristics, training, and professional practices of Swedish school psychologists. An analysis of the differences between training and professional practice, and a discussion of professionalization and professional attitudes of Swedish school psychologists, were also included. Survey findings indicated that there was no special training for school psychologists, and that the majority of school psychologists had the equivalent of a master's level degree in psychology. Rankings of the importance of various role functions during training and professional practice were also compiled. With few exceptions, t test analyses indicated significant differences in the relative importance of these role functions during training and practice. An analysis of the correlations between school psychologists' rankings of the more global role functions of assessment, treatment, consultation, organizational development, and research during their respective training, professional practice, ideal job, and perceived level of competence, reveal weak relationships between these four conditions, with the lowest correlation being between training and current job. Attitudes of professional autonomy, as well as findings on training, practice, and professional memberships and journal subscriptions suggest that Swedish school psychologists meet the criteria of a professional. Analysis of one year and five year career plans indicated that although most school respondents see themselves working as a school psychologist in the short term, only 45% anticipated working as a school psychologist in five years, with the majority of those leaving the field indicating that they intend to seek employment as a psychologist in a non-school setting. The results were discussed in relation to studies of school psychologists in other countries, particularly the United States. Limitations of the present study were discussed, as were topics for future research.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducationen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Foundations and Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMishra, Shitala P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberObrzut, John E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBergan, John R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChristensen, Oscar C., Jr.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNewlon, Betty J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9022116en_US
dc.identifier.oclc706713480en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.