Reliability analysis of maintained structural system vulnerable to fatigue and fracture.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184955
Title:
Reliability analysis of maintained structural system vulnerable to fatigue and fracture.
Author:
Torng, Tony Yi
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Metallic structures dominated by tensile loads are vulnerable to fatigue and fracture. Fatigue is produced by oscillatory loads. Quasi-static brittle or ductile fracture can result from a "large" load in the random sequence. Moreover, a fatigue or fracture failure in a member of a redundant structure produces impulsive redistributed loads to the intact members. These transient loads could produce a sequence of failures resulting in progressive collapse of the system. Fatigue and fracture design factors are subject to considerable uncertainty. Therefore, a probabilistic approach, which includes a system reliability assessment, is appropriate for design purposes. But system reliability can be improved by a maintenance program of periodic inspection with repair and/or replacement of damaged members. However, a maintenance program can be expensive. The ultimate goal of the engineer is to specify a design, inspection, and repair strategy to minimize life cycle costs. The fatigue/fracture reliability and maintainability (FRM) process for redundant structure can be a complicated random process. The structural model considered series, parallel, and parallel/series systems of elements. Applied to the system are fatigue loads including mean stress, an extreme load, as well as impulsive loads in parallel member systems. The failure modes are fatigue, brittle and ductile fracture. A refined fatigue model is employed which includes both the crack initiation and propagation phases. The FRM process cannot be solved easily using recently developed advanced structural reliability techniques. A "hybrid" simulation method which combines modified importance sampling (MIS) with inflated stress extrapolation (ISE) is proposed. MIS and ISE methods are developed and demonstrated using numerous examples which include series, parallel and series/parallel systems. Not only reasonable estimates of the probability of system failure but also an estimate of the distribution of time to system failure can be obtained. The time to failure distribution can be used to estimate the reliability function, hazard function, conditional reliability given survival at any time, etc. The demonstration cases illustrate how reliability of a system having given material properties is influenced by the number of series and parallel elements, stress level, mean stress, and various inspection/repair policies.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Reliability (Engineering) -- Mathematical models; Fracture mechanics; Materials -- Fatigue
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Wirsching, Paul H.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleReliability analysis of maintained structural system vulnerable to fatigue and fracture.en_US
dc.creatorTorng, Tony Yien_US
dc.contributor.authorTorng, Tony Yien_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMetallic structures dominated by tensile loads are vulnerable to fatigue and fracture. Fatigue is produced by oscillatory loads. Quasi-static brittle or ductile fracture can result from a "large" load in the random sequence. Moreover, a fatigue or fracture failure in a member of a redundant structure produces impulsive redistributed loads to the intact members. These transient loads could produce a sequence of failures resulting in progressive collapse of the system. Fatigue and fracture design factors are subject to considerable uncertainty. Therefore, a probabilistic approach, which includes a system reliability assessment, is appropriate for design purposes. But system reliability can be improved by a maintenance program of periodic inspection with repair and/or replacement of damaged members. However, a maintenance program can be expensive. The ultimate goal of the engineer is to specify a design, inspection, and repair strategy to minimize life cycle costs. The fatigue/fracture reliability and maintainability (FRM) process for redundant structure can be a complicated random process. The structural model considered series, parallel, and parallel/series systems of elements. Applied to the system are fatigue loads including mean stress, an extreme load, as well as impulsive loads in parallel member systems. The failure modes are fatigue, brittle and ductile fracture. A refined fatigue model is employed which includes both the crack initiation and propagation phases. The FRM process cannot be solved easily using recently developed advanced structural reliability techniques. A "hybrid" simulation method which combines modified importance sampling (MIS) with inflated stress extrapolation (ISE) is proposed. MIS and ISE methods are developed and demonstrated using numerous examples which include series, parallel and series/parallel systems. Not only reasonable estimates of the probability of system failure but also an estimate of the distribution of time to system failure can be obtained. The time to failure distribution can be used to estimate the reliability function, hazard function, conditional reliability given survival at any time, etc. The demonstration cases illustrate how reliability of a system having given material properties is influenced by the number of series and parallel elements, stress level, mean stress, and various inspection/repair policies.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectReliability (Engineering) -- Mathematical modelsen_US
dc.subjectFracture mechanicsen_US
dc.subjectMaterials -- Fatigueen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAerospace and Mechanical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWirsching, Paul H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStahl, Bernharden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberArabyan, Araen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9014683en_US
dc.identifier.oclc703621591en_US
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