The in vivo and in vitro effects of diethyldithiocarbamate on autoimmune New Zealand Black/White F₁ hybrid, MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr and related and normal murine strains.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184940
Title:
The in vivo and in vitro effects of diethyldithiocarbamate on autoimmune New Zealand Black/White F₁ hybrid, MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr and related and normal murine strains.
Author:
Halpern, Melissa Dale.
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
New Zealand Black/White F₁ hybrid (NZB/W) and MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr (MRL/lpr) mice spontaneously develop a Systemic Lupus Erythematosus-like autoimmune disease. While the primary immunologic defect in the NZB/W is due to B cells, in the MRL/lpr it is a result of T cell abnormalities. Diethyldithiocarbamate (DTC), an agent suggested to enhance T cell function, was used to treat both strains. Weekly treatment of NZB/W mice with 25 mg/kg DTC had no significant effect upon survival or autoantibody levels but did induce changes in cell surface antigen expression. MRL/lpr mice treated with DTC displayed normalization of cell surface antigen expression (particularly increased expression of Lyt-2, macrophage markers and Lyt-2⁺/L3T4⁺ thymocytes), decreased lymphoproliferation and thymic atrophy, decreased serum autoantibody levels and kidney deposition of C3 and IgM, restored responses to mitogens and significantly prolonged survival. To determine both the influence of MRL background and lpr genes and to better understand on what cell populations DTC effects, changes in cell surface antigen expression were examined in DTC treated MRL-+/+, Balb/c, and Balb/lpr strains. The only consistent similarities observed between all strains tested were DTC induced changes in Mac-1 splenocyte surface antigen expression. In vitro studies showed DTC to have variable effects upon the mitogenic responses of lymphoid cells to phytohemagluttinin, but DTC alone stimulated both MRL/lpr and Balb/lpr lymphocytes. DTC stimulated the null cell population that predominates in lpr gene-bearing mice, but all observed in vitro effects of DTC were dependent upon the adherent cell population included in culture. DTC had no apparent direct effects upon adherent cells alone however. These studies have shown that DTC is capable of positive effects upon one autoimmune murine strain, the MRL/lpr, but not the NZB/W. DTC appears to affect macrophages, but other cell populations are required to obtain full activity of this compound. The variable effects of DTC emphasize the need to define the immunopathology of individual patients with autoimmune disease before initiating treatment with immunomodulative therapy.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Organosulfur compounds -- Therapeutic use; Systemic lupus erythematosus -- Animal models; Autoimmunity -- Molecular aspects; Immunological adjuvants; Cell surface antigens.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Microbiology and Immunology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Yocum, David E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe in vivo and in vitro effects of diethyldithiocarbamate on autoimmune New Zealand Black/White F₁ hybrid, MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr and related and normal murine strains.en_US
dc.creatorHalpern, Melissa Dale.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHalpern, Melissa Dale.en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractNew Zealand Black/White F₁ hybrid (NZB/W) and MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr (MRL/lpr) mice spontaneously develop a Systemic Lupus Erythematosus-like autoimmune disease. While the primary immunologic defect in the NZB/W is due to B cells, in the MRL/lpr it is a result of T cell abnormalities. Diethyldithiocarbamate (DTC), an agent suggested to enhance T cell function, was used to treat both strains. Weekly treatment of NZB/W mice with 25 mg/kg DTC had no significant effect upon survival or autoantibody levels but did induce changes in cell surface antigen expression. MRL/lpr mice treated with DTC displayed normalization of cell surface antigen expression (particularly increased expression of Lyt-2, macrophage markers and Lyt-2⁺/L3T4⁺ thymocytes), decreased lymphoproliferation and thymic atrophy, decreased serum autoantibody levels and kidney deposition of C3 and IgM, restored responses to mitogens and significantly prolonged survival. To determine both the influence of MRL background and lpr genes and to better understand on what cell populations DTC effects, changes in cell surface antigen expression were examined in DTC treated MRL-+/+, Balb/c, and Balb/lpr strains. The only consistent similarities observed between all strains tested were DTC induced changes in Mac-1 splenocyte surface antigen expression. In vitro studies showed DTC to have variable effects upon the mitogenic responses of lymphoid cells to phytohemagluttinin, but DTC alone stimulated both MRL/lpr and Balb/lpr lymphocytes. DTC stimulated the null cell population that predominates in lpr gene-bearing mice, but all observed in vitro effects of DTC were dependent upon the adherent cell population included in culture. DTC had no apparent direct effects upon adherent cells alone however. These studies have shown that DTC is capable of positive effects upon one autoimmune murine strain, the MRL/lpr, but not the NZB/W. DTC appears to affect macrophages, but other cell populations are required to obtain full activity of this compound. The variable effects of DTC emphasize the need to define the immunopathology of individual patients with autoimmune disease before initiating treatment with immunomodulative therapy.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectOrganosulfur compounds -- Therapeutic useen_US
dc.subjectSystemic lupus erythematosus -- Animal modelsen_US
dc.subjectAutoimmunity -- Molecular aspectsen_US
dc.subjectImmunological adjuvantsen_US
dc.subjectCell surface antigens.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMicrobiology and Immunologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorYocum, David E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHalonen, Marilynen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMeinke, Geraldineen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBourque, Donen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMount, Daviden_US
dc.identifier.proquest9014669en_US
dc.identifier.oclc703615226en_US
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