Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184932
Title:
Wallace Stegner's "Angle of Repose": One reader's response.
Author:
Hepworth, James Ralph.
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation reads Wallace Stegner's Angle of Repose by combining objective and subjective critical approaches in an attempt to bridge the gap between storytelling understood formalistically and story in its moving immediacy. The study combines a close textual analysis of the novel with a detailed and extensive account of the critic's personal and emotional responses to it, and these two interpretive perspectives are supplemented by a series of three interviews conducted with the novelist over a period of ten years as well as by an exchange of letters between Stegner and Bernard DeVoto just prior to the publication of Stegner's Beyond the Hundredth Meridian (1951-1953). The study opens with a survey of Stegner's career and argues that his critics have misperceived him as a "regionalist" and undervalued him as a world-class American writer whose work transcends the limitations of place. The ensuing chapters focus on the relationship between the journal form of Angle of Repose and the westering tradition in American letters and on the way the novel situates itself in relation to native American aesthetics and the oral tradition. The burden of these early chapters is to demonstrate that the form of Stegner's novel is symbolic, not only in the formal sense of standing for something other than itself but also in the more subjective sense of figuring the emotional rhythms that it generates in the reader. Later chapters examine in detail the relations between the personal and emotional life of the critic and such technical and thematic issues as unreliable narrator, the Doppelganger motif, and the problems of origins and originality in American fiction. Taken together, the individual chapters are designed to show that Stegner is a postmodern storyteller with postmodern concerns, that he has, in fact, created Angle of Repose as a "counter-subversive novel" by employing the techniques of the so-called "chaos drunk writers" of the 1970's against themselves to produce a work of art that is at once highly original and self-consciously traditional.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
English; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dryden, Edgar

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleWallace Stegner's "Angle of Repose": One reader's response.en_US
dc.creatorHepworth, James Ralph.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHepworth, James Ralph.en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation reads Wallace Stegner's Angle of Repose by combining objective and subjective critical approaches in an attempt to bridge the gap between storytelling understood formalistically and story in its moving immediacy. The study combines a close textual analysis of the novel with a detailed and extensive account of the critic's personal and emotional responses to it, and these two interpretive perspectives are supplemented by a series of three interviews conducted with the novelist over a period of ten years as well as by an exchange of letters between Stegner and Bernard DeVoto just prior to the publication of Stegner's Beyond the Hundredth Meridian (1951-1953). The study opens with a survey of Stegner's career and argues that his critics have misperceived him as a "regionalist" and undervalued him as a world-class American writer whose work transcends the limitations of place. The ensuing chapters focus on the relationship between the journal form of Angle of Repose and the westering tradition in American letters and on the way the novel situates itself in relation to native American aesthetics and the oral tradition. The burden of these early chapters is to demonstrate that the form of Stegner's novel is symbolic, not only in the formal sense of standing for something other than itself but also in the more subjective sense of figuring the emotional rhythms that it generates in the reader. Later chapters examine in detail the relations between the personal and emotional life of the critic and such technical and thematic issues as unreliable narrator, the Doppelganger motif, and the problems of origins and originality in American fiction. Taken together, the individual chapters are designed to show that Stegner is a postmodern storyteller with postmodern concerns, that he has, in fact, created Angle of Repose as a "counter-subversive novel" by employing the techniques of the so-called "chaos drunk writers" of the 1970's against themselves to produce a work of art that is at once highly original and self-consciously traditional.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDryden, Edgaren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEvers, Lawrenceen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMomaday N. Scotten_US
dc.identifier.proquest9013731en_US
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