Antibiotic resistance, heavy metal resistance, chlorine resistance and phage typing patterns of fecal coliforms isolated from secondary effluent.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184925
Title:
Antibiotic resistance, heavy metal resistance, chlorine resistance and phage typing patterns of fecal coliforms isolated from secondary effluent.
Author:
Rusin, Patricia Anne.
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Antibiotic resistance profiles of fecal coliform isolated from unchlorinated and chlorinated secondary effluent were determined. Of 332 fecal coliforms isolated from chlorinated effluent a mean of 48% were multiply antibiotic resistant. In contrast, of 347 fecal coliforms isolated from unchlorinated effluent a mean of 29% were multiply antibiotic resistant. Resistance to ampicillin, cephalothin, and carbenicillin were significantly higher in the former than the latter. Randomly selected isolates survived and/or grew in sterile and unsterile effluent retaining resistance patterns for 40 days. Resistance factors were transferred in laboratory medium at frequencies from 0 to 1.2 x 10⁻² (number of recombinants/number of recipients) and in sterile neutralized tertiary effluent at frequencies from 0 to 1.0 x 10⁻⁴. Resuscitative techniques were necessary for optimal recovery of fecal coliforms from effluent using selective media. Antibiotic resistance patterns of fecal coliforms isolated from unchlorinated and chlorinated effluent was not associated with chlorine or heavy metal resistance. Multiply antibiotic resistant fecal coliforms from chlorinated effluent were significantly less sensitive to lytic phage than multiply antibiotic sensitive fecal coliforms from unchlorinated effluent (p < .05). Using group discriminate analysis of data, phage typing techniques were shown to be a potential tool for tracing fecal contamination of groundwater.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Escherichia coli; Sewage -- Microbiology; Microorganisms -- Effect of antibiotics on; Microorganisms -- Effect of metals on; Sewage -- Purification -- Chlorination
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Microbiology and Immunology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sinclair, Norval A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAntibiotic resistance, heavy metal resistance, chlorine resistance and phage typing patterns of fecal coliforms isolated from secondary effluent.en_US
dc.creatorRusin, Patricia Anne.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRusin, Patricia Anne.en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAntibiotic resistance profiles of fecal coliform isolated from unchlorinated and chlorinated secondary effluent were determined. Of 332 fecal coliforms isolated from chlorinated effluent a mean of 48% were multiply antibiotic resistant. In contrast, of 347 fecal coliforms isolated from unchlorinated effluent a mean of 29% were multiply antibiotic resistant. Resistance to ampicillin, cephalothin, and carbenicillin were significantly higher in the former than the latter. Randomly selected isolates survived and/or grew in sterile and unsterile effluent retaining resistance patterns for 40 days. Resistance factors were transferred in laboratory medium at frequencies from 0 to 1.2 x 10⁻² (number of recombinants/number of recipients) and in sterile neutralized tertiary effluent at frequencies from 0 to 1.0 x 10⁻⁴. Resuscitative techniques were necessary for optimal recovery of fecal coliforms from effluent using selective media. Antibiotic resistance patterns of fecal coliforms isolated from unchlorinated and chlorinated effluent was not associated with chlorine or heavy metal resistance. Multiply antibiotic resistant fecal coliforms from chlorinated effluent were significantly less sensitive to lytic phage than multiply antibiotic sensitive fecal coliforms from unchlorinated effluent (p < .05). Using group discriminate analysis of data, phage typing techniques were shown to be a potential tool for tracing fecal contamination of groundwater.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEscherichia colien_US
dc.subjectSewage -- Microbiologyen_US
dc.subjectMicroorganisms -- Effect of antibiotics onen_US
dc.subjectMicroorganisms -- Effect of metals onen_US
dc.subjectSewage -- Purification -- Chlorinationen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMicrobiology and Immunologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSinclair, Norval A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGerba, Charles, P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSterling, Charles R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPepper, Ian L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTucker, Thomas T.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9013182en_US
dc.identifier.oclc703441242en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.