Ingestive behavior of cattle grazing in lightly- and heavily-grazed patches of Lehmann lovegrass (Eragrostis lehmanniana Nees).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184908
Title:
Ingestive behavior of cattle grazing in lightly- and heavily-grazed patches of Lehmann lovegrass (Eragrostis lehmanniana Nees).
Author:
Abu-Zanat, Mahfouz Mohammed Waheed.
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Cattle grazing patterns on Lehmann lovegrass rangelands often create heavily-grazed (HG) areas surrounded by lightly-grazed (LG) or ungrazed patches. The purpose of this study was to characterize the forage resource and ingestive behavior of cattle grazing Lehmann lovegrass plants in both LG and HG patches on the Santa Rita Experimental Range. The general hypothesis was that residual bunchgrass vegetation resulted in sward characteristics which physically inhibited the efficiency of cattle grazing by increasing the manipulative activity per harvested bite. The overall heights of residual stems and green tillers averaged 70 and 49 cm for LG, 8 and 9 cm for HG patches. Biomass of total standing crop (SC), residual vegetation (RV) and green herbage (GH) averaged 4159, 3395 and 764 kg/ha for LG, 345, 185 and 160 kg/ha for HG patches, respectively. Bulk density of SC, RV and GH of LG and HG patches averaged 58, 48, and 19 [(gm/cm³) X 10⁻⁵] for LG, 38, 23 and 20 [(gm/cm³) X 10⁻⁵] for HG patches, respectively. The ratio of green herbage to residual vegetation averaged 0.22 for LG and 0.86 for HG patches. The different sward structure of LG and HG patches affected the ingestive behavior of the grazing cows. Overall handling time for each grazing bite averaged 1.5 and 1.2 sec/bite in LG and HG patches, respectively. Cows employed different foraging tactics in response to the dynamic changes of the sward conditions. Cows employed top biting extensively to harvest the seed-head and other green herbage at the top of the sward surface. As the height of residual stems increased and dominated the upper strata of the sward, side and low biting were mainly used by the cows as grazing methods to bite the plants to reduce the manipulative activity. Avoidance of LG patches or preference for HG patches was related to the sward structure and largely shaped by the build-up of residual vegetation. Removal of residual vegetation through fire, mowing or heavy utilization for short periods late in the growing season to allow for more accessible green herbage could improve both animal and pasture utilization of the range resource.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Grazing -- West (U.S.); Cattle -- Feeding and feeds; Love grass
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Renewable Natural Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ruyle, George B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleIngestive behavior of cattle grazing in lightly- and heavily-grazed patches of Lehmann lovegrass (Eragrostis lehmanniana Nees).en_US
dc.creatorAbu-Zanat, Mahfouz Mohammed Waheed.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAbu-Zanat, Mahfouz Mohammed Waheed.en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractCattle grazing patterns on Lehmann lovegrass rangelands often create heavily-grazed (HG) areas surrounded by lightly-grazed (LG) or ungrazed patches. The purpose of this study was to characterize the forage resource and ingestive behavior of cattle grazing Lehmann lovegrass plants in both LG and HG patches on the Santa Rita Experimental Range. The general hypothesis was that residual bunchgrass vegetation resulted in sward characteristics which physically inhibited the efficiency of cattle grazing by increasing the manipulative activity per harvested bite. The overall heights of residual stems and green tillers averaged 70 and 49 cm for LG, 8 and 9 cm for HG patches. Biomass of total standing crop (SC), residual vegetation (RV) and green herbage (GH) averaged 4159, 3395 and 764 kg/ha for LG, 345, 185 and 160 kg/ha for HG patches, respectively. Bulk density of SC, RV and GH of LG and HG patches averaged 58, 48, and 19 [(gm/cm³) X 10⁻⁵] for LG, 38, 23 and 20 [(gm/cm³) X 10⁻⁵] for HG patches, respectively. The ratio of green herbage to residual vegetation averaged 0.22 for LG and 0.86 for HG patches. The different sward structure of LG and HG patches affected the ingestive behavior of the grazing cows. Overall handling time for each grazing bite averaged 1.5 and 1.2 sec/bite in LG and HG patches, respectively. Cows employed different foraging tactics in response to the dynamic changes of the sward conditions. Cows employed top biting extensively to harvest the seed-head and other green herbage at the top of the sward surface. As the height of residual stems increased and dominated the upper strata of the sward, side and low biting were mainly used by the cows as grazing methods to bite the plants to reduce the manipulative activity. Avoidance of LG patches or preference for HG patches was related to the sward structure and largely shaped by the build-up of residual vegetation. Removal of residual vegetation through fire, mowing or heavy utilization for short periods late in the growing season to allow for more accessible green herbage could improve both animal and pasture utilization of the range resource.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectGrazing -- West (U.S.)en_US
dc.subjectCattle -- Feeding and feedsen_US
dc.subjectLove grassen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRuyle, George B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRoundy, Bruce A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOgden, Phil R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRice, Richard W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSwingle, Roy S.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9013166en_US
dc.identifier.oclc703632251en_US
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