Linear vs interactive video: Teaching and the transfer of learning of a professional skill.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/184902
Title:
Linear vs interactive video: Teaching and the transfer of learning of a professional skill.
Author:
Yoder, Marianne Eloise.
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study utilized an experimental design to measure cognitive learning of aseptic technique immediately after treatment and two weeks after treatment, and transfer of learning of the cognitive principles to a clinical skill. Baccalaureate nursing subjects were randomly assigned to either a linear video tape or computer assisted interactive video tape (CAIVI) group. Independent variables covering conative, cognitive, and affective learner characteristics were measured. Five hypotheses were tested. Data for this study were collected by means of investigator-developed pretest, posttest, and retention test, as well as a clinical performance checklist. Learner characteristics data were collected by means of the Group Embedded Figures Test (GEFT), Merritt and Marshall Learning Style Questionnaire, Mindfulness Survey, and the Salomon Amount of Invested Mental Effort (AIME) instrument. Academic ability was measured through the use of lower division grade point average. Results revealed that the most significant predictor of test scores was treatment group assignment and pretest scores. The CAIVI treatment group scored significantly higher on the posttest and clinical performance measure, likely as a result of a novelty effect. For both treatment groups, the factor contributing significantly to posttest scores was pretest score. However, for the retention test score, the factor contributing significantly was enjoyment of effort for the linear treatment subjects, and length of treatment time for the CAIVI treatment subjects. The effects of specific learner conative, cognitive, and affective characteristics were tested. Results revealed that none of the hypothesized relationships between learning and field independency/dependency, preferred learning style, mindfulness, or academic ability were supported. No significant aptitude-treatment interactions between the learner characteristics and treatment group were found. The CAIVI treatment in this study was found to be an effective teaching method for these subjects. However, the use of CAIVI in any professional curriculum should not be based solely upon the results of this study. The effectiveness, cost, and appropriateness of CAIVI must be considered before adoption.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Foundations and Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleLinear vs interactive video: Teaching and the transfer of learning of a professional skill.en_US
dc.creatorYoder, Marianne Eloise.en_US
dc.contributor.authorYoder, Marianne Eloise.en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study utilized an experimental design to measure cognitive learning of aseptic technique immediately after treatment and two weeks after treatment, and transfer of learning of the cognitive principles to a clinical skill. Baccalaureate nursing subjects were randomly assigned to either a linear video tape or computer assisted interactive video tape (CAIVI) group. Independent variables covering conative, cognitive, and affective learner characteristics were measured. Five hypotheses were tested. Data for this study were collected by means of investigator-developed pretest, posttest, and retention test, as well as a clinical performance checklist. Learner characteristics data were collected by means of the Group Embedded Figures Test (GEFT), Merritt and Marshall Learning Style Questionnaire, Mindfulness Survey, and the Salomon Amount of Invested Mental Effort (AIME) instrument. Academic ability was measured through the use of lower division grade point average. Results revealed that the most significant predictor of test scores was treatment group assignment and pretest scores. The CAIVI treatment group scored significantly higher on the posttest and clinical performance measure, likely as a result of a novelty effect. For both treatment groups, the factor contributing significantly to posttest scores was pretest score. However, for the retention test score, the factor contributing significantly was enjoyment of effort for the linear treatment subjects, and length of treatment time for the CAIVI treatment subjects. The effects of specific learner conative, cognitive, and affective characteristics were tested. Results revealed that none of the hypothesized relationships between learning and field independency/dependency, preferred learning style, mindfulness, or academic ability were supported. No significant aptitude-treatment interactions between the learner characteristics and treatment group were found. The CAIVI treatment in this study was found to be an effective teaching method for these subjects. However, the use of CAIVI in any professional curriculum should not be based solely upon the results of this study. The effectiveness, cost, and appropriateness of CAIVI must be considered before adoption.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Foundations and Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9013163en_US
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